Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Session 24A: Risk Assessment & Emergency Response - Livestream
Time:
Wednesday, 15/Sept/2021:
8:00am - 10:15am

Location: 120AB

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Presentations
8:00am - 8:45am

Assessment of Critical Dependencies for Rapid Disaster Recovery

Wayne Gresh1, Dave Breitenstein2, Kent Yu3

1Carollo Engineers; 2City of Eugene, OR; 3SEFT Consulting Group; ,

The Metropolitan Wastewater Management Commission (MWMC) mission is to protect the community’s health and environment by providing high-quality wastewater services to the Eugene-Springfield metropolitan area. In alignment with that mission, MWMC identified and assessed critical dependencies that could impact its ability to respond and recover from a disaster. The effort was part of developing a Disaster Mitigation and Recovery Plan that assessed expected performance of conveyance and treatment facilities and outlined actions and upgrades needed to achieve Oregon Resiliency Plan level of service goals for the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake and MWMC’s internal goals for a catastrophic flood adjusted to reflect climate change effects.

To identify critical dependencies, staff used a matrix provided by its consultant team to explore and rank what was most needed for disaster response and recovery. This effort identified employee and family preparedness; City and regional roads; telecommunications; post-event structural assessments; up-to-date Emergency Operations and Continuity of Operations plans; power; data; vendor and shipping services; fuel; and post-event mechanical, electrical, and plumbing assessments as the ten most critical dependencies.

Each of the critical dependencies were assessed by the consultant team in partnership with staff members. This included (a) staff responding to a survey that assessed employee and family preparedness and (b) identifying critical materials and supplies and the respective vendors. The consultant team worked with staff and Eugene and Springfield Emergency Managers to develop actions that could be taken to be better prepared and minimize the potential for cascading failures.

MWMC has found this effort very valuable to gain a better awareness and understanding of the critical dependencies through staff engagement. The effort provided a direct benefit in the effort needed to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. In March 2020 Eugene updated its continuity of operations plan, one of the dependencies identified. Based on that update they were prepared and successfully implemented procedures to address chain of command, reduced staffing, and accounting procedures needed during the emergency. This presentation will focus on the critical dependencies identified and the actions outlined to better prepare for disaster response and recovery.



8:45am - 9:30am

Seismic Resilience and Implications on Critical Infrastructure

Scott Schlechter, Jason Bock

GRI, United States of America; ,

The Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) located off the coast of Washington, Oregon and California can produce some of the largest earthquakes (magnitude 9.0) in the world. Over the past 10,000 years, this fault has had 41 significant ruptures with the last large event in 1700. This equates to an approximately 30% chance of another major rupture (Mw 8+) in the next 50 years. Oregon legislature recognized the potential hazard and in 2013, the Oregon Seismic Safety Policy Advisory Commission published the Oregon Resilience Plan to determine likely impacts of a CSZ earthquake. The plan addresses acceptable timeframes to restore infrastructure after an earthquake/tsunami event and changes that Oregon can take to reach resilience targets. During the plan’s development, a Water and Wastewater Task Group was created to review vulnerabilities of the state’s pipelines, treatment plants, and pump stations. Per the findings of the plan, drinking water and sewer infrastructure could take up to three years to restore services. Since then it has been left to individual agencies to figure out what to do with aging infrastructure and ways to reduce the damage a CSZ earthquake will have on critical drinking water and sewer systems. Navigating various seismic codes and identifying the right plan is not an easy task. The Oregon Resilience Plan is not specifically tied to design code guidance and therefore there is not a clear approach to seismic resiliency that will be the right fit for every agency. This presentation will focus on how owners and design teams can collaborate to prepare a risk assessment model that will establish how to define resilience, system impacts, and solutions for mitigation. A case study completed at the Port of Portland will demonstrate how to implement a risk assessment model. Through the case study, we will cover the roles of the owner and designer, hazard identification, risks to the economic structure, developing practical mitigation strategies, and cost-benefit analysis. Key takeaways will include steps for understanding state and regional expectations for resilience, demystifying seismic analyses and design, and strategies to prepare infrastructure to be resilient.



9:30am - 10:15am

Regional Water System Risk Analysis and Planning

Jason Hurless1, Byron Smith2

1Stantec Consulting Services Inc., United States of America; 2City of Hermiston, Oregon; ,

The City of Hermiston and the Port of Umatilla are partners in the ownership and management of the Regional Water System (RWS) located in the Greater Hermiston, OR area. The RWS was created in the mid-1990’s to convey up to an ultimate flow of 27,000 gpm of Columbia River water to connected and rate paying users. The water is pulled from just upstream of the McNary Dam by the Intake Pump Station and conveyed through nearly nine miles of 42-inch Ameron pipeline to booster stations, a water treatment plant and the end users. These users range from food processors, power generating facilities, data centers, agricultural growers and the City of Hermiston for potable water treatment. The RWS infrastructure is nearly 30 years old, however, the number of users and the sophistication of the system has expanded greatly since it’s creation. With the aging facilities in mind and overall economic importance of the RWS increasing, the RWS requested that Stantec Consulting Services Inc. perform the RWS’s first facility plan. As part of this facility planning effort, Stantec performed a condition assessment on the RWS facilities and worked closely with the users, City and the Port on a system by system risk evaluation. The risks were assigned occurrence probabilities and associated costs if the risks were realized. The weighted risks were monetized and ranked for prioritization purposes. Three main output were developed resulting from this effort:

  1. Future projects were prioritized and an overall CIP for the system established.
  2. Targeted emergency reserve funds were established to manage the potential risks.
  3. Non-potable and potable water rates were updated to create adequate reserve funds as part of the risk mitigation strategy.

The CIP framework was finalized and communicated to the users with the first year of capital upgrades projects underway.



 
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