Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

 
 
Session Overview
Session
Session 23A: Construction & Alternate Delivery: Collaboration & Communications - Livestream
Time:
Wednesday, 15/Sept/2021:
8:00am - 10:15am

Location: Room 430AB
East Building

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Presentations
8:00am - 8:45am

Building Resilient Communities Through Building Resilient Teams

Josh Baker1, Jeff Hodson2, Mike Zeltner3, Tyler Resnick4

1City of Boise; 2Jacobs; 3Brown and Caldwell; 4McAlvain Companies, Inc.; , , ,

Four years ago, the Lander Street Water Renewal Facility Phase 1 Improvements project team set out to create a resilient team that could deliver the City of Boise’s largest construction project in recent history. The project was well under way replacing deteriorating infrastructure when the global pandemic hit. This presented many different challenges which have changed the way we all work. Throughout this experience, our patience has been tested, relationships strained, and processes challenged, but the work put into developing the team paid dividends throughout those difficulties.

The City selected the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) delivery model for this project and elected to bring the CM/GC into the project at the start of the engineering effort. This allowed for early team chartering and branding to prevent tripartite silos from forming. The project team quickly adapted the mindset of “we are protectors of infrastructure and of the Boise River.”

One of the key attributes of the project team’s approach is their willingness to challenge the status quo and modify a process if it is not working as intended. An example of this is the design coordination log (the process formerly known as requests for information). This use of this log has resulted in issuing early engineering clarifications that have outpaced subcontractor questions and allowed work in the field to progress without delays.

The project team has also enhanced communication by using multiple, real-time methods between engineering and field staff while leveraging asynchronous communication to manage the project narrative with stakeholders. The result has been optimized teamwork and collaboration, better informed management, increased communication with subcontractors, and decreased risk of miscommunication.

The project to date has not lost any schedule (even considering COVID) and has a deductive change order value while being almost halfway complete. This is attributed to the strong relationships that have formed and the resilient team approach that has been taken. The lessons that have been learned are being applied to the next phase of improvements in an effort to continue to overcome difficult situations and create our future.



8:45am - 9:30am

Pumping Up Communication Through Progressive Design Build

Katie Spilker1, Amanda Mesick1, Jessica MacClanahan2

1Kennedy Jenks Consultants; 2City of Bend; ,

The City of Bend’s North Interceptor Sewer Project (NISP), identified in the Collection System Master Plan (CSMP), consists of design and construction of a sewer transmission system to accommodate the City’s growth plans, policies, and incorporate redundancy into the system. Along with serving an expanding UGB, the proposed alignment also allows for the decommissioning of up to ten (10) lift stations as an added benefit.

At the confluence of the existing Plant Interceptor and the newly planned NISP, a critical deficiency in hydraulic capacity for future growth was identified. It required the evaluation of alternatives for pipeline sizing, configuration, and routing, with an overall goal to set the City of Bend up for success long into the future. Through a collaborative decision-making process, our team leveraged a broad range of City stakeholders and arrived at a consensus to add an influent pump station at the Water Reclamation Facility (WRF). As a result, a significant challenge emerged with how to limit impacts on WRF operations during start-up and testing of the pump station.

This presentation will outline the vision and drivers for this project, along with sharing a success story on how utilities can use Progressive Design Build to deliver projects that mitigate impacts on operations. Attendees will learn about developing an integrated team, establishing the correct level of communication, and lessons learned that can be applied to future projects. Finally, the presentation will focus on creating a culture of change in project implementation that emphasizes integration of operations into the decision-making process. Pumping up Communication through Progressive Design Build resulted in a seamless transition from a gravity-fed treatment plant to one supplied by an influent lift station at the City of Bend’s WRF.



9:30am - 10:15am

Going Beyond Expectations: Collaborating to Deliver an Award-Winning Facility

Michael Borrero1, Brett Arvidson2

1Carollo Engineers, United States of America; 2City of Oak Harbor;

The City of Oak Harbor (City) completed construction of its new $125 million Clean Water Facility (CWF) producing Class A reclaimed water quality effluent to the Puget Sound. Two overriding project goals for the City were protecting the environment and constructing a facility that was integrated into the community. With the greenfield CWF located downtown and adjacent to the waterfront Windjammer Park, the City incorporated architectural features and park amenities with the CWF project to become a civic asset woven into the community fabric.

Getting the project permitted and completed on schedule was a complex task due to site constraints, environmental restrictions, and the likelihood of encountering cultural resources. The City became one of Washington State’s first wastewater projects to be delivered under the alternative project delivery approach of a heavy-civil General Contractor/Construction Management (GC/CM). The GC/CM’s suggested approach shortened construction by 2 years from a conventional design-bid-build project by including:

  • Early procurement and segmented work packages proceeding during design
  • Development and timing of design packages to always keep the GC/CM productive

Schedule related challenges were ultimately overcome by developing a genuine partnership with an eye to keeping quality expectations high. Implementation of these early design packages were successful and reinforced positive work relationships with the City, Engineer and GC/CM Contractor.

Presentation will include specifics on:

  • Lessons learned of the project challenges including start-up and commissioning
  • Collaborative efforts examples between the Engineer, City and GC/CM to integrate the CWF into the community
  • Results to the cultural resources approach

The efforts to bring the CWF to life have been recognized by the national American Public Works Association (APWA), American Council of Engineering Consultants (ACEC) and the Engineer-News Record (ENR) Best Projects for the Pacific Northwest region.



 
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