Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 1st Dec 2021, 01:31:38pm CET

 
 
Session Overview
Date: Sunday, 19/Sept/2021
3:00pm - 6:00pmDGGV Vorstandssitzung
 
6:00pm - 8:30pmIcebreaker
 
Date: Monday, 20/Sept/2021
9:00am - 10:30am10.2 Material use of geothermal waters
Session Chair: Valentin Magnus Goldberg, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: Tobias Kluge, KIT

The production of geothermal energy requires the circulation of large volumes of thermal brines reaching up to several 100 L/s. These brines are the product of long-time water-rock interactions at a high temperature and depth leading to various water compositions. The contained ions have been used for the chemical characterization of a reservoir and are further a challenge for the power plant operator due to the possibility of uncontrolled mineral formation. The chemical analysis of the waters and the related precipitates have shown that the waters can contain critical and strategic mineral commodities at various concentrations. According to known standards of raw material extraction, these are not classic deposits due to their low concentrations. However, in consideration of the high annual volumes circulating in geothermal systems, relevant amounts of different raw materials are in theory extractable. An advantage of the geothermal brines is that the elements of interest are already dissolved in the water and do not have to be extracted from the rock first. Furthermore, a geothermal power plant provides decentralized heat and energy for further refinement of the raw materials. The implementation of a cost-effective and deployable mineral recovery in the geothermal cycle can thus improve the economics of geothermal energy and open up a new raw material market.

 
9:00am - 10:30am11.3 The fate of hydrogen: underground storage, nuclear waste repositories and natural hydrogen fluxes
Session Chair: Christian Ostertag-Henning, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe
Session Chair: Thorsten Schäfer, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

Over the past years the interest in geochemical reactions forming or oxidizing molecular hydrogen has soared: In addition to the long-standing issue of possible hydrogen production in high-level nuclear waste repositories due to corrosion of canisters or radiolysis of water, the energy transition considering molecular hydrogen as energy carrier calls for a thorough understanding of possible reactions during subsurface storage of hydrogen. Recent findings of unusually hydrogen-rich soil gases have underlined the importance of elucidating the natural hydrogen cycle before advancing the large-scale usage of hydrogen as energy carrier. This session will combine contributions investigating the reactions, processes and kinetics of formation or oxidation of hydrogen e.g. on mineral surfaces or by microorganisms – from both experimentalists and modelers to foster the exchange. Additionally, it will integrate research on controls of hydrogen migration – as loss from subsurface storage, possible pressure-release mechanism during the long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste or in the context of natural hydrogen fluxes in marine (e.g. hydrothermal) and continental settings, prerequisite for possible accumulations of hydrogen in the geosphere.

 
9:00am - 10:30am1.1-1 Sediment routing systems and provenance analysis
Session Chair: Laura Stutenbecker, TU Darmstadt
Session Chair: Hilmar von Eynatten, University of Göttingen
Session Chair: Guido Meinhold, Keele University

This session is co-hosted by the 'Fachsektion Sedimentologie' of the DGGV.

The composition of clastic sediments or sedimentary rocks is a result of source area properties, sediment generation and transport processes as well as post-depositional changes. Deciphering the provenance of clastic deposits can therefore provide valuable insights into tectonic, geomorphic, climatic and anthropogenic factors and processes shaping sedimentary systems over different temporal and spatial scales. This session welcomes contributions that investigate (1) the provenance of clastic deposits by analyzing compositional (e.g. mineralogical, geochemical) properties, (2) the processes that modify detrital signals throughout the sedimentary routing system, and (3) the relationships to internal and external forcing mechanisms.

 
9:00am - 10:30am2.1-1 Carbonatites and alkaline rocks
Session Chair: Michael Marks, Universität Tübingen
Session Chair: Benjamin Florian Walter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: R. Johannes Giebel, Technische Universität Berlin

This session thematizes the formation, evolution and economic importance of carbonatites and alkaline rocks. These play an important role for our society, as they contain exceptional high levels of critical raw materials, such as REE, Nb, P and F, to name a few. However, to understand how such deposits form, we need to understand how their rocks and mineral assemblages formed in space and time.Although our knowledge about the formation and mineralization as well as the magmatic and post-magmatic modification of carbonatites and alkaline rocks strongly improved over the last decades and the extraction of related raw materials could be steadily refined, there are still many open questions that need to be addressed. We encourage participants to submit and present their studies relating to carbonatites and alkaline rocks in this sub-session and to discuss and network their research. The scope of this session covers the formation, the ascent and the emplacement, but also the mineralization, differentiation and alteration of these unique rocks as well as their exploration, exploitation and processing. Experiments and numerical calculations are as welcome as field work studies and analytical investigations.

 
9:00am - 10:30am8.4 Induced Seismicity and Wind Turbine Emissions: Sources – Monitoring – Modelling - Mitigation
Session Chair: Joachim Ritter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: Stefan Baisch, Q-con GmbH
Session Chair: Andreas Rietbrock, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

The issue of seismicity induced by human activities, e.g. through fluid injection (waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing), has become increasingly important with technology upscaling. In some regions of the world, seismicity associated with the exploitation of hydrocarbons exceeds natural earthquake activity. Monitoring of induced seismicity with local networks is a key element for managing induced seismicity risks. At the same time there is an increasing number of wind turbines and the associated increase of ground vibrations. This combination complicates ground motion analyses and can disturb earthquake monitoring. A lot of research is ongoing in these topics and we want to provide a platform for exchanging latest results and ideas. Therefore, we invite contributions from research on induced seismicity and/or technically induced seismic signals covering theory, observations and experimental aspects. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am21-1 Open Session
Session Chair: Armin Zeh, KIT
 
10:30am - 10:45amGreetings
 
10:45am - 12:00pmPanel Discussion: "Energiewende mit Wasserstoff?"

Moderators: Christoph Hilgers, KIT & Jürgen Grötsch, President DGGV

Panel Members:

  • Prof. Dr. Holger Hanselka, President of the KIT and Vice-President Research Field Energy, Helmholtz Association, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
  • Dr. Klaus Langemann, Wintershall Dea AG, Senior Vice-President Carbon Management & Hydrogen, Friedrich-Ebert-Straße 160, 34119 Kassel, Germany
  • Dr. Markus Oles, ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG, Head of Carbon2Chem, Sustainable Production, 47166 Duisburg, Germany
  • Hans-Joachim Polk, VNG AG, Member of the Executive Board, Infrastructure & Technical Affairs, Braunstraße 7, 04347 Leipzig, Germany
  • Michael Schmidt, Deutsche Rohstoffagentur (DERA) in der Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Wilhelmstraße 25-30, 13593 Berlin-Spandau, Germany

In Deutschland soll Wasserstoff mit Hilfe von erneuerbaren Energien gewonnen und als Energieträger im Verkehrssektor und als Rohstoff in der Industrie verwendet werden. Die deutsche Wasserstoffstrategie geht davon aus, dass übergangsweise auch CO2-neutraler Wasserstoff aus der Methan-Pyrolyse und aus Erdgas mit CO2-Speicherung genutzt wird. Die bis 2030 in Deutschland geplanten Elektrolyseure mit einer Kapazität von 5 GW werden etwa 14% der erwarteten Nachfrage liefern.Wie kann der Bedarf an preisgünstigem Wasserstoff gedeckt und die sichere Zwischenspeicherung in großen Untertagespeichern und dezentral bei Großverbrauchern gewährleistet werden? Ist ein zusätzlicher Wettbewerb um Rohstoffe für den Bau von Elektrolyseuren und Erneuerbare-Energieanlagen zur Herstellung von Wasserstoff zu erwarten, wenn gleichzeitig auch andere Industrieländer eine Wasserstoffwirtschaft entwickeln? Sind Innovationen abzusehen, die Wasserstoff im Verkehrssektor und als Rohstoff der Industrie wettbewerbsfähig machen?

Diskussionsteilnehmer:

• Prof. Dr. Holger Hanselka, President of the KIT and Vice-President Research Field Energy, Helmholtz Association, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany

• Dr. Klaus Langemann, WintershallDEA GmbH, Senior Vice-President Carbon Management & Hydrogen, Friedrich-Ebert-Straße 160, 34119 Kassel, Germany

• Dr. Markus Oles, ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG, Head of Carbon2Chem, Sustainable Production, 47166 Duisburg, Germany

• Hans-Joachim Polk, VNG AG, Member of the Executive Board, Infrastructure & Technical Affairs, Braunstraße 7, 04347 Leipzig, Germany

• Michael Schmidt, Deutsche Rohstoffagentur (DERA) in der Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Wilhelmstraße 25-30, 13593 Berlin-Spandau, Germany

 
12:00pm - 12:30pmAwards

Hans-Cloos-Preis/Stipendium 2020: Dr. Laura Stutenbecker

Eugen-Seibold-Medaille 2020: Prof. Dr. Thorsten J. Nagel

Serge-von-Bubnoff-Medaille 2020: Prof. Dr. Theo Simon

Leopold-von-Buch-Plakette 2020: Prof. Dr. Gillian R. Foulger

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmGeoEnergy Exploration Game - you wanna find heat? by KIT SPE Student Chapter & SPE Yps

Be part of the Geoenergy Exploration Game by the German Section of the SPE! This collaborative game builds on your engagement, your knowledge, and your discussions! Together with the other participants, you have to identify geoenergy reservoirs, decide which play you want to explore and tackle multiple challenges. This interdisciplinary and interactive session aims at students, YPs, and interested professionals.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm10.3 Uncertainty Characterisation in Geothermal Exploration
Session Chair: Jeroen van der Vaart, TU Darmstadt

With the urgent need to quickly reduce CO2 emissions, deep geothermal energy can provide an indispensable contribution in the future energy mix. To encourage future projects, it is essential to significantly decrease the exploration risks of geothermal projects. This reduction should encourage investments, increase the probability of success and decrease surface impact to communities. Ranging from direct exploration risks to surface implications for communities, this session is directed to uncertainty quantification and risk reduction e.g. geological modelling, novel exploration as well as reservoir testing and monitoring techniques. Armed with this knowledge, better decisions can be made for project developments, like selection of drilling targets, reservoir operations or mitigations efforts. We invite contributions on geological, geophysical and reservoir engineering aspects of uncertainty quantification and risk reduction within Geothermal energy.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm10.4-1 Understanding reactions and transport in porous and fractured media - from rock analytics to predictive modelling
Session Chair: Benjamin Busch, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie
Session Chair: Marita Felder, PanTerra Geoconsultants
Session Chair: Michael Kühn, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

The interaction of fluid and rock, and the properties of pores and their connectivity are among the main controls on the production and storage potential in clastic and carbonate rocks. At least as much as in the hydrocarbon sector, the exploration of geothermal resources or storage sites for CO2 or hydrogen, require knowledge of processes on the pore scale. Compaction, cementation, dissolution, and alteration, control the evolution of reservoir quality and are also key to understanding the risk of formation damage. All may occur on geological time scales or happen rather quickly during production or storage as the composition and/or pressure of the pore fluids is changed dramatically within a short period of time. The process-based understanding of diagenesis controlling reservoir behavior will aid in future utilization of the subsurface in outlining possibilities for better assessment, prediction chances and risks of classic and renewable energy. Numerical simulations are the only way to connect micro-scale processes, which may significantly alter the internal rock structure, with the macro-scale, which consequently affect the hydraulic behaviour of the system.This session aims to showcase recent developments in reservoir petrography, petrographic modelling, and prediction utilizing multiple geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods and approaches like reactive transport modelling. We invite submissions presenting e.g., case studies, integrations of novel methodologies, and new interpretations of legacy data for future energy challenges. 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.1-2 Sediment routing systems and provenance analysis
Session Chair: Laura Stutenbecker, TU Darmstadt
Session Chair: Hilmar von Eynatten, University of Göttingen
Session Chair: Guido Meinhold, Keele University

This session is co-hosted by the 'Fachsektion Sedimentologie' of the DGGV.

The composition of clastic sediments or sedimentary rocks is a result of source area properties, sediment generation and transport processes as well as post-depositional changes. Deciphering the provenance of clastic deposits can therefore provide valuable insights into tectonic, geomorphic, climatic and anthropogenic factors and processes shaping sedimentary systems over different temporal and spatial scales. This session welcomes contributions that investigate (1) the provenance of clastic deposits by analyzing compositional (e.g. mineralogical, geochemical) properties, (2) the processes that modify detrital signals throughout the sedimentary routing system, and (3) the relationships to internal and external forcing mechanisms.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm2.1-2 Carbonatites and alkaline rocks
Session Chair: Michael Marks, Universität Tübingen
Session Chair: Benjamin Florian Walter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: R. Johannes Giebel, Technische Universität Berlin

This session thematizes the formation, evolution and economic importance of carbonatites and alkaline rocks. These play an important role for our society, as they contain exceptional high levels of critical raw materials, such as REE, Nb, P and F, to name a few. However, to understand how such deposits form, we need to understand how their rocks and mineral assemblages formed in space and time.Although our knowledge about the formation and mineralization as well as the magmatic and post-magmatic modification of carbonatites and alkaline rocks strongly improved over the last decades and the extraction of related raw materials could be steadily refined, there are still many open questions that need to be addressed. We encourage participants to submit and present their studies relating to carbonatites and alkaline rocks in this sub-session and to discuss and network their research. The scope of this session covers the formation, the ascent and the emplacement, but also the mineralization, differentiation and alteration of these unique rocks as well as their exploration, exploitation and processing. Experiments and numerical calculations are as welcome as field work studies and analytical investigations.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm8.2-1 Gravity-based density models and their applications
Session Chair: Denis Anikiev, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
Session Chair: Hans-Jürgen Götze, CAU Kiel

Gravity measurements contain important information about the subsurface at every spatial scale. Satellite missions provide highly accurate, global measurements, that allow building and testing 3D models of the Earth even for regions where other geophysical measurements are sparse. Depending on the envisaged model resolution and application, gravity data from regional or local surveys (e.g. ship and airborne) can be incorporated to provide higher resolution. However, solutions to the gravity inverse problem are non-unique and constraints by independent geological and geophysical observations need to be integrated to develop reliable subsurface density models. Such models, in turn, provide insights into subsurface variations in composition and thermo-mechanical state.In this session, we welcome contributions that integrate gravity and/or gradient data (at all scales) with other geophysical measurements and geological information to better understand the structure, properties and processes of the Earth’s subsurface. Hence, we would like to discuss diverse applications, from global scale, where mantle properties are assessed, down to the reservoir scale. We also welcome more technical contributions that address related topics like innovative joint inversion methods, model uncertainty estimation and determinations of parameter sensitivities, as well as temporal variations of the gravity field, and new interpretation software and techniques.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm21-2 Open Session
Session Chair: Armin Zeh, KIT
 
3:00pm - 3:15pmCoffee break
 
3:15pm - 4:00pmPlenary: From Poverty to Prosperity: The Real Energy Transition

Scott W. Tinker more information

 
4:00pm - 4:15pmCoffee break
 
4:15pm - 5:45pm10.4-2 Understanding reactions and transport in porous and fractured media - from rock analytics to predictive modelling
Session Chair: Benjamin Busch, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie
Session Chair: Michael Kühn, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

The interaction of fluid and rock, and the properties of pores and their connectivity are among the main controls on the production and storage potential in clastic and carbonate rocks. At least as much as in the hydrocarbon sector, the exploration of geothermal resources or storage sites for CO2 or hydrogen, require knowledge of processes on the pore scale. Compaction, cementation, dissolution, and alteration, control the evolution of reservoir quality and are also key to understanding the risk of formation damage. All may occur on geological time scales or happen rather quickly during production or storage as the composition and/or pressure of the pore fluids is changed dramatically within a short period of time. The process-based understanding of diagenesis controlling reservoir behavior will aid in future utilization of the subsurface in outlining possibilities for better assessment, prediction chances and risks of classic and renewable energy. Numerical simulations are the only way to connect micro-scale processes, which may significantly alter the internal rock structure, with the macro-scale, which consequently affect the hydraulic behaviour of the system.This session aims to showcase recent developments in reservoir petrography, petrographic modelling, and prediction utilizing multiple geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods and approaches like reactive transport modelling. We invite submissions presenting e.g., case studies, integrations of novel methodologies, and new interpretations of legacy data for future energy challenges. 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm1.2 Advances in understanding processes driving the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins
Session Chair: Liviu Matenco, Utrecht University
Session Chair: Magdalena Scheck-Wenderoth, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam I GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
Session Chair: Fadi Henri Nader, Utrecht University

This session addresses the dynamics of sedimentary basins at different temporal and spatial scales and aims to bring together a wide range of studies focusing on geodynamics, tectonics and sediment dynamics. Contributions addressing major processes affecting the genesis and evolution of basins are in particular encouraged (from rifting and overlying passive continental margins to orogenic, intra-montane and extensional back-arcs in convergent settings). A wide range of studies are encouraged, aimed at understanding the evolution of sedimentary fill, the underlying crustal and lithospheric -scale dynamics as well as the integration with processes taking place in the source areas, such as active orogens or long-term landscape evolution. We welcome contributions integrating data from different depth levels of the lithosphere with the shallower parts of the basin system as subsidence pattern, stress, vertical motions, erosion and sedimentation dynamics, thermal structure, lithosphere dynamics and (active) faulting by the means of observational studies, numerical and analogue modeling, or their combination. Studies yielding constraints on a variety of conceptual and quantitative models explaining the origin and evolution of basins are also welcomed.Session sponsored by the International Lithosphere Program Task Force VI Sedimentary Basins 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm2.4 Magmatic and metamorphic petrology
Session Chair: Armin Zeh, KIT
Session Chair: Dominik Gudelius, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

The Earth’s crust and related mineral resources were formed and modified by magmatic and metamorphic process through Earth’s history. Understanding of these processes in space and time is therefore of fundamental interest for Geoscientist and Society. This session deals with all aspects of magmatic and metamorphic rocks formed through Earth’s history from global to nanoscale. Presentations are welcome dealing with (i) experimental petrology, (ii) field-based studies on magmatic and metamorphic rocks and processes in all kind of geological settings, from crust to mantle and back, (iii) thermodynamic and kinetic modelling, and (iv) related geochronological aspects.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm8.2-2 Gravity-based density models and their applications
Session Chair: Wolfgang Szwillus, Kiel University
Session Chair: Judith Bott, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

Gravity measurements contain important information about the subsurface at every spatial scale. Satellite missions provide highly accurate, global measurements, that allow building and testing 3D models of the Earth even for regions where other geophysical measurements are sparse. Depending on the envisaged model resolution and application, gravity data from regional or local surveys (e.g. ship and airborne) can be incorporated to provide higher resolution. However, solutions to the gravity inverse problem are non-unique and constraints by independent geological and geophysical observations need to be integrated to develop reliable subsurface density models. Such models, in turn, provide insights into subsurface variations in composition and thermo-mechanical state.In this session, we welcome contributions that integrate gravity and/or gradient data (at all scales) with other geophysical measurements and geological information to better understand the structure, properties and processes of the Earth’s subsurface. Hence, we would like to discuss diverse applications, from global scale, where mantle properties are assessed, down to the reservoir scale. We also welcome more technical contributions that address related topics like innovative joint inversion methods, model uncertainty estimation and determinations of parameter sensitivities, as well as temporal variations of the gravity field, and new interpretation software and techniques.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pmVirtual Field Trips: Geological dive around the globe
Session Chair: Pankaj Khanna, Ali I. Al-Naimi Petroleum Engineering Research Center

 

This session will showcase geological field trips to some of the most spectacular outcrops around the world. Virtual Outcrops provide an opportunity to a larger audience to visualize and learn about outcrops that expose a certain geological characteristic (architecture/structure/facies heterogeneity amongst a few), and have academic / industry relevance.In reservoir studies, outcrop analogues provide important insights into the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of reservoir properties, which in turn affect hydrocarbon recovery and cost-effective reservoir development. The advent of high resolution drone and satellite based remote sensing techniques has opened a window to illuminate a blind spot in reservoir studies that existed between low resolution 3D seismic data and high resolution 2D data from wells.The datasets included in the field trips would be (but not limited to) standard sedimentological, but also geological and petrophysical data. The presenters are allowed to use any 3D platforms which caters to their needs to carry out a 3D virtual field trip. 

Intended Audience: This session will present current research as well as tools and applications that are intended to be of interest to both academic and industry audience. Audience will be exposed to most current tools and applications being utilized to not only work but also display 3D outcrop models.

 
5:45pm - 6:00pmCoffee break
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topics: 1.1, 1.2
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topics: 2.1, 5.1
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topics: 8.2, 10.2
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topics: 11.3
 
6:45pm - 7:00pmCoffee break
 
7:00pm - 8:00pmPublic Evening Lecture: Geology on Mars

Dr. John P. Grotzinger is the Harold Brown Professor of Geology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology. more information

 
Date: Tuesday, 21/Sept/2021
9:00am - 10:30am13.4 Industrial Resource Strategies
Session Chair: Kathryn Goodenough, British Geological Survey
Session Chair: Katharina Steiger, Karlsruhe Institut for Technology

During the last decades, the needs in metals for the industry kept increasing in volume but also in diversity. All predictive modelling shows that this will not change in the following decades. The European industry is mainly relying on import, leaving the European countries vulnerable against supply shortage and market manipulation for many commodities. Recycling can only cover parts of the raw materials needs and technologies are not fully developed for many metals yet. In order to secure and improve access to raw materials, the European Union (EU) fosters a resurgence of mineral exploration to better know the mineral resources in Europe, ensure material supply and develop its autonomy (European Commission 2018). We welcome submissions that investigate the industrial, political, societal and regulatory view on mineral resources, exploration and mining approaches that will underpin security of supply for industry, and strategies for resilient value chains and more efficient raw materials use.

 
9:00am - 10:30am11.2-1 Approaches to Sustainably Develop the Subsurface Potential for Storage and Disposal
Session Chair: Max Wippich, DEEP.KBB GmbH
Session Chair: Till Popp, Institut für Gebirgsmechanik GmbH

To accomplish the energy transition, new methodologies and technical solutions for the storage of renewable energies need to be developed. A fundamental challenge lies in the fact that energy production from renewable sources (wind or sun) is subject to fluctuations that do not match the daily and/or seasonal swings of energy demand. Furthermore, the safe long-term disposal of environmentally hazardous nuclear and toxic waste in geological repositories is a social responsibility.With salt caverns and porous reservoirs, the subsurface offers a great potential for the storage of energy carriers (e.g. hydrogen, synthetic methane), potential energy (compressed energy) or thermal energy. Regardless of the time scale (daily seasonal or even over periods of up to 1 million years), barrier formations like salt, clay or crystalline rock ensure the necessary integrity and safety.This session aims to connect research, technical concepts and case studies addressing the geological boundary conditions of the various storage and repository options. The range of topics involve the description and assessment of the properties of storage and barrier formations and the relevant processes that occur during the operation and post-operation/abandonment phases of storages and repositories. These include the development of exploration methods, laboratory investigations to characterise rock properties at various scales, and the modelling-based analyses and simulations of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and (geo)chemical processes. An elementary part of these efforts is the incorporation of experience gained over the past decades to validate the models and methods used, as well as the linking of different scales of magnitude.

 
9:00am - 10:30am1.7-1 Critical Metals in the Environment
Session Chair: David M. Ernst, Jacobs University Bremen
Session Chair: Franziska Klimpel, Jacobs University Bremen
Session Chair: Dennis Krämer, Jacobs University Bremen
Session Chair: Anna-Lena Zocher, Jacobs University Bremen

In the past years, certain trace elements hitherto only used as geochemical proxies have gained increasing societal and economic importance due to their restricted and insecure supply and high importance for high-tech applications such as enabling technologies. These critical metals are now included in the list of critical raw materials, published by the EU in 2020. Critical metals are, for example, the rare earth elements and the platinum group elements, but also more “exotic” ones like antimony, gallium, germanium, hafnium, indium, scandium, tantalum, tungsten and vanadium.Although the increasing application of these metals results in a growing input from anthropogenic sources into the environment, knowledge of their environmental behaviour, their bioavailability and their (eco)toxicity are still in their infancy. This limited knowledge is partly caused by the fact that many of these metals occur at very low concentrations in the natural environment, posing additional analytical challenges.This session collects contributions related to critical high-technology metals in the environment, especially, but not limited to, studies on a) their analytical determination in various matrices, also including analysis of plant and animal tissues, b) their geochemical behaviour in Earth’s surface systems, i.e. the critical zone, c) their anthropogenic input, d) studies on bioavailability and (eco)toxicity, and e) rehabilitation of contaminated sites. We especially welcome contributions from Early Career scientists and from the EU Innovative Training Network "PANORAMA” (euroPean trAining NetwOrk on Rare eArth elements environMental trAnsfer: from rock to human).

 
9:00am - 10:30am1.3-1 Geodynamic and its influence on topography evolution in Central and Northern Europe: From the Past to the Present
Session Chair: Ulrich Anton Glasmacher, Heidelberg University
Session Chair: Hans-Peter Bunge, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet

Central and Northern Europe has experienced several stages of geodynamic evolution leading to significant changes of topography in the past. Whereas the Caledonian and Variscan topographic evolution is caused by the collision of different plates at their borders the topographic and sedimentological evolution over the last 100 Myr in Central Europe occurs within the plate. Historically, fare field effects of the Alpine orogeny and the rotation of Spain are taken as the geodynamic cause for the change of the Central European Lithosphere. Nevertheless, the initial state and topography of the Central European Lithosphere at 100 Myr is important to understand the Post-100 Myr evolution. Significant exhumation, local subsidence and magmatic activities are key players during the last 100 Myr. Newly dated tectonic movements shed a new light on the multiple structural evolution during this time interval. As salt layers are important throughout the European lithosphere their influence on all processes have to be considered and understood. To unravel the geodynamic causes for the topographic evolution within the Central European plate various data sets have to be combined.Therefore, the session seeks for contributions from Central to Northern Europe including the Alpine Orogeny by using tomography, seismic interpretations, thermochronology, structural interpretations, isotopic dating, sedimentology, salt deposits magmatic and metamorphic petrology and map interpretations. We would appreciate contributions describing the Early Mesozoic geodynamic evolution of Central Europe as well.

 
9:00am - 10:30am18.1-1 Young Scientist Session
Session Chair: Iris Arndt, Goethe University Frankfurt
Session Chair: Thora Schubert, RWTH Aachen University
Session Chair: Joshua Sawall, Technische Universität Berlin

If you are a young scientist, this session provides the opportunity to present your work among peers. We will consider everybody without PhD or with a recently finished PhD project a young scientist. You can present your latest project, your thesis or your PhD progress; submissions from all fields in geoscience are welcome. We especially welcome all those who will present at a conference for the first time. The primary focus of the session is to provide a platform for young scientists to present and discuss their work in a conference environment with a diverse audience.If large enough, the session will be subdivided according to discipline as identified by the submitted abstracts.

 
9:00am - 10:30am16.1 Latest Achievements in Scientific Ocean and Continental Drilling
Session Chair: Lisa Marie Egger, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe
Session Chair: Christoph Böttner, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
Session Chair: Gareth James Crutchley, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

National and international Earth science programs are utilizing Scientific Drilling as a critical tool to understand climate and environmental variability, natural hazards such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, natural resources, the deep biosphere and other topics of socio-economic relevance. The principal goal of the session is to summarize latest scientific achievements in ocean, continental and polar drilling.

 
10:30am - 10:45amCoffee break
 
10:45am - 12:00pmPanel Discussion: "Kritische Rohstoffe"

Moderators: Jochen Kolb, KIT & Christoph Hilgers, KIT

Panel Members:

  • Prof. Dr. Thomas Hirth, Vice-President for Innovation and International Affairs, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
  • Dr. Peter Buchholz, Head of Deutsche Rohstoffagentur (DERA) in der Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), 13593 Berlin-Spandau, Germany
  • Moritz Ostenrieder, Managing Director at Sachtleben Minerals GmbH & Co. KG, 77756 Hausach, Germany
  • Dr.-Ing. Andreas Wendt, Mitglied des Vorstands der BMW AG, Einkauf und Lieferantennetzwerk
 
12:00pm - 12:30pmAwards

Hermann-Credner-Preis/Stipendium 2021: Dr. Gabriel C. Rau

Hans-Cloos-Preis/Stipendium 2021: Dr. Yvonne T. Spychala

Serge-von-Bubnoff-Medaille 2021: Dr. Gösta Hoffmann

Gustav-Steinmann-Medaille 2020: Prof. Gerhard Bohrmann

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmBreak
 
12:30pm - 1:30pmIndustry Event: Bruker AXS GmbH "Elemental Analysis Solutions for Geological & Geochemical Applications"

Lecturer: Dr. Adrian Fiege and Dr. Jan Stelling

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmSGA Student Chapter: “networking speed dating”
 
1:30pm - 3:00pm13.2-1 Metal fluxes in the oceanic crust and implications on the formation of hydrothermal mineralizations
Session Chair: Clifford Patten, KIT
Session Chair: Malte Junge, Mineralogische Staatssammlung München (SNSB-MSM) / LMU München
Session Chair: Manuel Keith, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Future discovery of mineral resources requires a better understanding of the mineralized system at large scale. Metal fluxes in the oceanic crust have direct and indirect impact on the formation and composition of hydrothermal mineralizations in active black smoker systems, but also in their ancient analogues including volcanogenic massive sulfides and possibly in some epithermal-porphyry systems. These fluxes occur at different stages during the evolution of the oceanic crust and in very diverse tectonic environments, such as slow- and fast-spreading ridges, back-arc basins, island-arcs and continental-arcs, strongly affecting the intensity and nature of the fluxes. Seafloor hydrothermal alteration is critical for hydrothermal ore deposit formation, but it is still poorly constrained in many tectonic environments. Of particular importance are magmatic-hydrothermal processes related to crustal formation, especially in arc-related environments. The competitive effect of sulfide saturation and magmatic degassing during magmatic differentiation can strongly affect the metal endowment of a system, but over whole remains poorly understood. Finally, oceanic crust dehydration in subduction zones has strong impact on the overlying mantle composition and its redox condition, but metal fluxes remain elusive and can possibly have far reaching implications on the formation of hydrothermal mineralizations in oceanic and continental arc environments. In this session we welcome field based, experimental or modelling studies which focus on metal fluxes from modern day oceanic crust or ophiolites. 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm11.2-2 Approaches to Sustainably Develop the Subsurface Potential for Storage and Disposal
Session Chair: Andreas Henk, TU Darmstadt
Session Chair: Alexander Raith, DEEP.KBB GmbH

To accomplish the energy transition, new methodologies and technical solutions for the storage of renewable energies need to be developed. A fundamental challenge lies in the fact that energy production from renewable sources (wind or sun) is subject to fluctuations that do not match the daily and/or seasonal swings of energy demand. Furthermore, the safe long-term disposal of environmentally hazardous nuclear and toxic waste in geological repositories is a social responsibility.With salt caverns and porous reservoirs, the subsurface offers a great potential for the storage of energy carriers (e.g. hydrogen, synthetic methane), potential energy (compressed energy) or thermal energy. Regardless of the time scale (daily seasonal or even over periods of up to 1 million years), barrier formations like salt, clay or crystalline rock ensure the necessary integrity and safety.This session aims to connect research, technical concepts and case studies addressing the geological boundary conditions of the various storage and repository options. The range of topics involve the description and assessment of the properties of storage and barrier formations and the relevant processes that occur during the operation and post-operation/abandonment phases of storages and repositories. These include the development of exploration methods, laboratory investigations to characterise rock properties at various scales, and the modelling-based analyses and simulations of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and (geo)chemical processes. An elementary part of these efforts is the incorporation of experience gained over the past decades to validate the models and methods used, as well as the linking of different scales of magnitude.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.7-2 Critical Metals in the Environment
Session Chair: David M. Ernst, Jacobs University Bremen
Session Chair: Franziska Klimpel, Jacobs University Bremen
Session Chair: Dennis Krämer, Jacobs University Bremen
Session Chair: Anna-Lena Zocher, Jacobs University Bremen

In the past years, certain trace elements hitherto only used as geochemical proxies have gained increasing societal and economic importance due to their restricted and insecure supply and high importance for high-tech applications such as enabling technologies. These critical metals are now included in the list of critical raw materials, published by the EU in 2020. Critical metals are, for example, the rare earth elements and the platinum group elements, but also more “exotic” ones like antimony, gallium, germanium, hafnium, indium, scandium, tantalum, tungsten and vanadium.Although the increasing application of these metals results in a growing input from anthropogenic sources into the environment, knowledge of their environmental behaviour, their bioavailability and their (eco)toxicity are still in their infancy. This limited knowledge is partly caused by the fact that many of these metals occur at very low concentrations in the natural environment, posing additional analytical challenges.This session collects contributions related to critical high-technology metals in the environment, especially, but not limited to, studies on a) their analytical determination in various matrices, also including analysis of plant and animal tissues, b) their geochemical behaviour in Earth’s surface systems, i.e. the critical zone, c) their anthropogenic input, d) studies on bioavailability and (eco)toxicity, and e) rehabilitation of contaminated sites. We especially welcome contributions from Early Career scientists and from the EU Innovative Training Network "PANORAMA” (euroPean trAining NetwOrk on Rare eArth elements environMental trAnsfer: from rock to human).

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.3-2 Geodynamic and its influence on topography evolution in Central and Northern Europe: From the Past to the Present
Session Chair: Ulrich Anton Glasmacher, Heidelberg University
Session Chair: Hans-Peter Bunge, Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet

Central and Northern Europe has experienced several stages of geodynamic evolution leading to significant changes of topography in the past. Whereas the Caledonian and Variscan topographic evolution is caused by the collision of different plates at their borders the topographic and sedimentological evolution over the last 100 Myr in Central Europe occurs within the plate. Historically, fare field effects of the Alpine orogeny and the rotation of Spain are taken as the geodynamic cause for the change of the Central European Lithosphere. Nevertheless, the initial state and topography of the Central European Lithosphere at 100 Myr is important to understand the Post-100 Myr evolution. Significant exhumation, local subsidence and magmatic activities are key players during the last 100 Myr. Newly dated tectonic movements shed a new light on the multiple structural evolution during this time interval. As salt layers are important throughout the European lithosphere their influence on all processes have to be considered and understood. To unravel the geodynamic causes for the topographic evolution within the Central European plate various data sets have to be combined.Therefore, the session seeks for contributions from Central to Northern Europe including the Alpine Orogeny by using tomography, seismic interpretations, thermochronology, structural interpretations, isotopic dating, sedimentology, salt deposits magmatic and metamorphic petrology and map interpretations. We would appreciate contributions describing the Early Mesozoic geodynamic evolution of Central Europe as well.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm18.1-2 Young Scientist Session
Session Chair: Iris Arndt, Goethe University Frankfurt
Session Chair: Thora Schubert, RWTH Aachen University
Session Chair: Joshua Sawall, Technische Universität Berlin

If you are a young scientist, this session provides the opportunity to present your work among peers. We will consider everybody without PhD or with a recently finished PhD project a young scientist. You can present your latest project, your thesis or your PhD progress; submissions from all fields in geoscience are welcome. We especially welcome all those who will present at a conference for the first time. The primary focus of the session is to provide a platform for young scientists to present and discuss their work in a conference environment with a diverse audience.If large enough, the session will be subdivided according to discipline as identified by the submitted abstracts.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm17.1 Recent advances in geoscientific investigations of the ocean floor
Session Chair: Gerhard Bohrmann, University of Bremen
Session Chair: Ruediger Stein, Center for Marine Environmental Sciences (MARUM), Bremen University
Session Chair: Wolfgang Bach, Universität Bremen

The ocean covers 71% of our earth's surface and is much more difficult to access for geoscientific investigations than the land surface. Although scientists have been studying the ocean from research vessels for more than a century, interest in a global understanding of the earth system and its causal loop processes has led to increased efforts in marine research in recent decades. The seabed has been drilled for more than 50 years and the international drilling program (currently the International Ocean Discovery Program - IODP) is constantly leading to a new aspect in understanding of the interaction of the earth's crust, water masses, ice caps, the atmosphere and the living world today and in the past. State-of-the-art research vessels with advanced deep-submergence technology, such as robotic sea-floor drill rigs and giant-piston coring, submersibles, ROVs and AUVs, as well as acoustic and seismic systems are used to investigate various processes on the seafloor and in the sub-seafloor, some in 4D. In this session we would like to encourage all geoscientists to present exciting results from ship expeditions and marine studies over the past few years.

 
3:00pm - 3:15pmCoffee break
 
3:15pm - 4:00pmPlenary: Critical Raw Materials for the Energy Transition

Kathryn Goodenough more information

 
4:00pm - 4:15pmCoffee break
 
4:15pm - 5:45pm13.2-2 Metal fluxes in the oceanic crust and implications on the formation of hydrothermal mineralizations
Session Chair: Clifford Patten, KIT
Session Chair: Malte Junge, Mineralogische Staatssammlung München (SNSB-MSM) / LMU München
Session Chair: Manuel Keith, Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

Future discovery of mineral resources requires a better understanding of the mineralized system at large scale. Metal fluxes in the oceanic crust have direct and indirect impact on the formation and composition of hydrothermal mineralizations in active black smoker systems, but also in their ancient analogues including volcanogenic massive sulfides and possibly in some epithermal-porphyry systems. These fluxes occur at different stages during the evolution of the oceanic crust and in very diverse tectonic environments, such as slow- and fast-spreading ridges, back-arc basins, island-arcs and continental-arcs, strongly affecting the intensity and nature of the fluxes. Seafloor hydrothermal alteration is critical for hydrothermal ore deposit formation, but it is still poorly constrained in many tectonic environments. Of particular importance are magmatic-hydrothermal processes related to crustal formation, especially in arc-related environments. The competitive effect of sulfide saturation and magmatic degassing during magmatic differentiation can strongly affect the metal endowment of a system, but over whole remains poorly understood. Finally, oceanic crust dehydration in subduction zones has strong impact on the overlying mantle composition and its redox condition, but metal fluxes remain elusive and can possibly have far reaching implications on the formation of hydrothermal mineralizations in oceanic and continental arc environments. In this session we welcome field based, experimental or modelling studies which focus on metal fluxes from modern day oceanic crust or ophiolites. 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm9.2 Groundwater quality: new developments on understanding transport and mobility of contaminants related to anthropogenic impacts
Session Chair: Tobias Licha, Ruhr Universität Bochum
Session Chair: Ferry Schiperski, TU Berlin

Groundwater quality is widely compromised by anthropogenic impact. This becomes evident by the presence of numerous anthropogenic organic and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Contaminants are of widespread origin. They enter the groundwater associated to different processes such as sewer failure, agricultural activities or contaminated industrial sites.Understanding the input mechanism, transport, attenuation and degradation processes in short and long term is crucial for sustainable groundwater development.Although unwanted, contaminants even in smallest quantities might provide information for locating their input or allow for understanding transport and attenuation processes within aquifers. In addition, microbial communities might not only be harmful but assist in the degradation of harmful substances.We call for contributions that deal with groundwater quality in all type of aquifers (e.g. alluvial, fractured, and karst aquifers). We welcome topics such as urban groundwater, new tools for water quality characterization, organic micropollutants in groundwater, microbial contaminants (such as bacteria, virus, and protozoans), groundwater remediation, and water quality monitoring.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm15.3 Geodata management – »From bookshelves to full digital accessibility«
Session Chair: Tanja Wodtke, BGR - Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe
Session Chair: Jørgen Tulstrup, GEUS - Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland

Easy access and fast exchange of geoscientific data in compliance with legal requirements and societal needs are of great importance to solve the geoscientific challenges of the 21st century, including e.g. the exploration of raw materials for the energy transition and the search and selection of radioactive waste repositories.Since about 15 years EU legislation aims to open and harmonize digital data existing at national authorities e.g. by the INSPIRE directive or the so-called PSI directive on the re-use of public sector information. Public authorities are thus competent and experienced in the sustainable storage, digital publication and visualization of geoscientific data since decades. In 2020, the Geological Data Act (Geologiedaten-Gesetz) became effective in Germany and notably revised the handling of information resulting from geological investigations in order to ensure a broad public accessibility of geological data, resulting in new challenges to harmonize and integrate the constantly growing amount of data.This session invites contributions on geodata management solutions or approaches in government agencies, academics, and private companies.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm1.4 Numerical modelling of sedimentary basins and petroleum systems
Session Chair: Rüdiger Lutz, r.lutz@bgr.de

Sedimentary basins contain the vast majority of all energy resources, including coal, petroleum, natural gas but also geothermal energy and are also the most important storage sites for anthropogenic solids and fluids. During basin evolution, organic matter-rich sediments and sedimentary rocks are exposed to changing pressure and temperature conditions, which lead to mineralogical and geochemical reactions. Systematic and innovative studies on rock properties, laboratory experiments under well-defined physical and chemical conditions as well as numerical modelling are required to determine rates of transformation, but also fluid flow at different scales.We invite contributions to this session dealing with sedimentary systems and their constituent elements. We welcome basin modeling studies from crustal to reservoir scale, studies on various aspects of the petroleum system, e.g. source rock deposition, maturation, petroleum generation, expulsion and biodegradation, studies on temperature and heat flow evolution in sedimentary systems. 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm18.1-3 Young Scientist Session
Session Chair: Iris Arndt, Goethe University Frankfurt
Session Chair: Thora Schubert, RWTH Aachen University
Session Chair: Joshua Sawall, Technische Universität Berlin

If you are a young scientist, this session provides the opportunity to present your work among peers. We will consider everybody without PhD or with a recently finished PhD project a young scientist. You can present your latest project, your thesis or your PhD progress; submissions from all fields in geoscience are welcome. We especially welcome all those who will present at a conference for the first time. The primary focus of the session is to provide a platform for young scientists to present and discuss their work in a conference environment with a diverse audience.If large enough, the session will be subdivided according to discipline as identified by the submitted abstracts.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm15.2 Strategies to enable FAIR and Open Data and Software
Session Chair: Andreas Hübner, Freie Universität Berlin
Session Chair: Thorsten Agemar, LIAG
Session Chair: Dirk Fleischer, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf

Demands for integrity, transparency and reproducibility of today's research are increasing, posing new challenges for research data and software management in all science communities. The geoscience community is responding to these requests with a growing number of scientific networks and strategic initiatives, at different levels and with varying thrust. Clearly, publicly funded geoscience research data and software will increasingly be part and parcel of these frameworks: among them national efforts such as the German National Research Data Infrastructure (NFDI) or international ventures like the bottom-up driven Research Data Alliance (RDA) or the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). Organizations and institutions will certainly need to interact with these initiatives and adopt emerging results/services. Early integration into these frameworks will provide institutions with the opportunity to strategically interact with them and shaping the future of FAIR and open data and software management, that will become reality.This session invites contributions from largescale and/or strategic efforts in the geosciences to present their programs and approaches. Showcases of integrations into these frameworks by organisations and institutions are invited as well to serve as inspiration and possible blueprints for others.

 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topic: 1.4
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topic: 11.2, 13.2
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topic: 15.3, 17.1
 
6:00pm - 6:45pmPoster session for Topic: 16.1
 
7:00pm - 9:00pmDGGV Mitgliederversammlung / Members' Meeting
 
Date: Wednesday, 22/Sept/2021
9:00am - 10:30am13.3 Exploration and extraction of key battery commodities for e-mobility
Session Chair: Andreas Barth, Beak Consultants GmbH
Session Chair: Stephan Peters, DMT GmbH & Co. KG

The growing need for energy storage for e-mobility and other battery-intense applications has created a large interest in the key battery commodity Lithium (Li) as well as other critical raw materials like Ni, Co, Cu and graphite. Current forecasts assume that Li-ion battery technologies will be the prevalent battery technology for the foreseeable future. Especially the need for e-vehicle batteries with high energy densities will see the demand for Li increase more than 3-fold until 2025. The strongly growing demand for raw materials used in e-mobility have raised concerns regarding the long-term supply availability of these commodities.The session shall highlight current activities in exploration and extraction of critical raw materials for e-mobility and availability of resources and reserves in Europe and worldwide. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am1.5 Dating and Rating Landscape Evolution with Geochemical Methods on Geomorphic to Geologic Time Scales
Session Chair: Andrea Madella, Universität Tübingen
Session Chair: Sarah Falkowski, University of Tübingen
Session Chair: Paul Reinhold Eizenhöfer, University of Tübingen
Session Chair: Christoph Glotzbach, University Tübingen

The Earth's surface is under constant change. Tectonic, climatic, biogenic and anthropogenic forcings have a measurable impact on erosion, weathering and surface uplift. Information on the interactions among these processes and their spatio-temporal distribution can be inferred from observations of the available geologic archives. These involve, among others, the morphology and the geochemical-mineralogical composition of exposed bedrock, sedimentary products and soils. In order to successfully predict future landscape responses, it is therefore important to investigate these archives and to quantify the timing and rate of past landscape changes in response to the different forcings. In this session, we gather contributions involving state-of-the-art applications of geochronologic, thermochronologic and geochemical methods, aiming to quantify dates and rates of landscape change. In particular, we welcome any field-, laboratory- and/or modeling-based study, covering a range of timescales (hundreds to millions years), spatial scales (hillslope, catchment, orogen) and techniques (e.g. cosmogenic nuclides, thermochronology, luminescence, isotopic dating, etc...).

 
9:00am - 10:30am8.3 Mineral and rock magnetism for reservoir characterization
Session Chair: Agnes Kontny, KIT
Session Chair: Katarzyna Dudzisz, KIT

Magnetic properties of rocks show a wide range of geoscience applications and they are rapid and non-destructive to measure. Magnetic susceptibility is one of the most common magnetic parameters that allows to distinguish between different rock types and to understand geological processes that are related to Fe-mineralogy. The physical basis for the discrimination is the nature of magnetic minerals, their distribution, and grain size. Thus, magnetic methods show great potential for reservoir rock characterization, fabric determination, ore deposits, environmental issues, and even pore fabric studies. We particularly encourage contributions dealing with reservoir characterization applying magnetic methods from all areas of geology including method developments and applications of magnetic methods in all kinds of geological reservoir characterization. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am4.1/2 Tectonic Systems (TSK Open Session)
Session Chair: Niko Froitzheim, Universität Bonn
Session Chair: Dennis Quandt, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

4.1: Veins are common structures in rocks and occur in different geological settings ranging from continental to oceanic crustal environments. They form by mineral precipitation from a fluid phase within a dilatational site or due to displacive mineral growth. Veins may form under a range of temperatures and pressures and precipitate from fluids of different origin. As a result, vein structures and microtextures as well as mineralogical, elemental, and isotopic compositions vary depending on the geological environment and local to regional physicochemical conditions. Therefore, veins are ubiquitous structures in the geological record and represent an insightful geological material and tool to answer diverse research questions. In previous studies, vein microtextures and geochemical compositions of vein minerals have been widely used to reconstruct kinematic histories of rocks and to quantify the physicochemical conditions under which veins formed, respectively. Thus, this session invites contributions from structural geology using veins as stress and strain indicators, geochemical studies investigating elemental and isotopic vein mineral compositions such as fluid-rock interactions, laboratory as well as numerical experiments simulating natural vein microtextures, and applied geosciences dealing with ore mineralization hosted in veins. 

4.2: We invite contributions from the fields of tectonics, structural geology, and crystalline geology. Regional and process-oriented studies from all kinds of active or fossil tectonic settings are welcome – rifting, ocean spreading, subduction, collision, transform, as well as intra-plate deformation. Studies dealing with the development of methods related to the deformation of crust and lithosphere from the micro-scale to plate scale are also invited.

 
9:00am - 10:30am7.1-1 Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences
Session Chair: Melanie Kaliwoda, SNSB /LMU
Session Chair: Jörg Göttlicher, KIT

Spectroscopic methods with their capability to gain information on atoms and molecules are becoming more and more relevant in earth sciences in order to open up new fields of research and to solve problems in the various scientific disciplines. Therefore, it is important to have an exchange, which methods are especially suitable for different requirements. The session Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences is addressed to all geoscientific researchers who use spectroscopic technologies such as Raman, Infrared (IR), UV/Vis, X-ray, Electron and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy as well as Mass spectrometry (MS). Also contributions of investigations that involve a spectroscopic method not listed here are highly welcome.

 
10:30am - 10:45amCoffee break
 
10:45am - 12:00pmPanel Discussion: "The Future of Geodata Management"

Moderators:  Jürgen Grötsch, President DGGV & Christoph Hilgers, KIT

Panel Members:

  • Karen Hanghoj, Director British Geological Survey (BGS)

  • Ralph Watzel, Director Germany Geological Survey (BGR)

  • Maximilian Ahrens, CTO T-Systems

  • Johan Krebbers, Shell & OSDU

 
12:00pm - 12:30pmAwards

Rolf-und-Marlies-Teichmüller-Preis 2020: Prof. Dr. Walter Riegel

Serge-von-Bubnoff-Medaille 2021: Prof. Dr. Jan-Michael Lange

Eugen-Seibold-Medaille 2021: Dr. Hella Wittmann-Oelze

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmBreak
 
12:30pm - 1:30pmEarly Career Researcher Event from jDGGV
Session Chair: Iris Arndt, Goethe University Frankfurt
Session Chair: Laura Krone, jDGGV

Hello fellow ECRs,

our ECR networking event will take place on Wednesday at lunchtime (12:30 pm). All students (BSc, MSc, PhD) and postdocs are welcome! We will provide a room to get to know you fellow ECRs and talk about some of the typical questions that are concerning geoscientists at early career stages, such as:

  • How can I network (more) efficiently?
  • What are effective strategies for a healthy work-life balance?
  • How to get hot coffee and cool beer on field trips in remote regions?
  • If I move to another city or country to enhance my career, how do I not lose my friends, family, relationship, and health insurance on the way?
  • How to process my data and pack them into informative graphics?
  • Staying in science?! Do interesting geo-related jobs, in which I can gain personal fulfilment and know whether I am still employed next year, exist on this planet?

We are looking forward to an informal exchange and a fun lunch break with you!

See you there,

Iris and Laura from jDGGV

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmIndustry Event: Agilent Technologies "How ICP-MS and ICP- MS/MS provide critical key data from resources to processing"

Lecturer: Gernot Hudin and Jörg Hansmann

This lunch seminar is aimed at all users, students, and laboratory managers to demonstrate the full range of possibilities offered by modern ICP-MS. The second part will then present the ICP-MS/MS technique as a tool for particularly demanding tasks or connections to laser systems. The technique is based on the fact that, with suitable pre-sorting of the ions in the first quadrupole before the collision/reaction cell, particularly strong molecular interferences and even isobaric superpositions can be processed. In this way, particularly detectable elements can be determined in difficult sample types such as geochemical digests, for which there was previously no good determination option.

The challenges in element analysis are becoming more and more demanding due to adapted regulations. When we look future for elemental analysis, we could think of new inclusions to this where, by certain techniques such as AAS and ICP-OES could well have reached their limits of detection. Listening to the thoughts in the market these new inclusions could encompass; the addition of Uranium to the TVO, the lowering of the limits of detection for Cr and Pb, or even that the determination of element species such as inorganic As and Cr VI become of greater interest. In addition to this we hear ongoing discussions in the field around the determination of synthetic inorganic nanoparticles in the Environmental and Food markets. 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm13.1-1 European Raw Materials
Session Chair: Antje Wittenberg, BGR
Session Chair: Henrike Sievers, BGR

Raw Materials are crucial components of a resilient and sustainable economy and society. A sustainable supply of primary raw materials needs accessible mineral deposits and efficiently productive mines. Competing land-use issues, social and environmental challenges, declining ore grades, resource nationalism are just a few aspects, which seems to make it increasingly challenging to secure supplies. The realisation of a low-carbon society and new technologies – especially in the light of the "European Green Deal” – change future raw material needs and set a focus in so-called critical raw materials.Although Europe has a long history in mining, it is still widely underexplored in particular with modern exploration methods. A good understanding of mineral systems, mining sites and remaining resources of historical sites will stay of utmost importance.This session thus invites contributions focussing on European mineral deposits and exploration and mining activities that indicate a socio-economic importance to the German / European society in particular.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.8 Earth Surface Dynamics and Processes under Climatic and Tectonic controls
Session Chair: Michael Krautblatter, TU München
Session Chair: Aaron Bufe, German Research Centre for Geosciences
Session Chair: Stefanie Tofelde, University of Potsdam

Earth's surface is subject to a complex interplay of tectonic, atmospheric, and biologic forcing and processes of chemical and physical weathering and erosion. In turn, surface processes can modulate climate, tectonics, and life by the cycling of sediments, water, nutrients, and carbon. Predicting the sensitivity of the Earth's surface to changes in climatic or tectonic forcing, therefore requires an understanding of individual processes as well as their interactions across spatial and temporal scales. Here we invite studies that use field, experimental, and modelling approaches to constrain the patterns and rates of erosion, weathering, and transport of solids and solutes across the Earth surface, and to assess their sensitivity to climatic, tectonic, or biologic change.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm1.9 Depositional and diagenetic processes in carbonate systems
Session Chair: Lars Reuning, CAU Kiel, Institute of Geosciences

Modern carbonate systems such as reefs provide livelihood and ecosystem services, such as coastal protection and food security, for hundreds of millions of people. Fossil carbonate systems are important archives of environmental change and form a valuable resource for renewable energy exploration and exploitation such as geothermal heat but also for CO2 sequestration. Over the past decades, our understanding of carbonate systems has improved by the combination of traditional fieldwork with new techniques such as 3D seismic analysis, modeling, high-resolution 3D microscopy, and advanced geochemical methods. This session seeks to present studies applying state of the art methodologies in addressing open questions in the broad field of carbonate sedimentation and diagenesis. We especially encourage contributions to the following themes: 1) Anthropogenic influences on modern carbonate systems or carbonate secreting organisms, 2) Impact of diagenesis on palaeo-environmental and palaeoclimatological carbonate archives, (3) Biogeochemical and physicochemical processes driving carbonate precipitation and alteration processes, and (4) Petrophysical and geophysical characterization of carbonate systems.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm6.1-1 Applications in 3D Geological Modelling
Session Chair: Rouwen Johannes Lehné, HLNUG
Session Chair: Roland Baumberger, Swiss Geological Survey
Session Chair: Stephan Steuer, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe

Over the last decades, 3D geological modelling has become a standard in hydrocarbon exploration and production, has been adopted and is developing towards a systematic effort by geological surveys, and is on the verge of being able to properly handle the structurally complex settings in which the mining sector operates. New, exciting possibilities are arising and new application domains are opening up, which challenges geomodellers to integrate data and methods from different domains (e.g. remote-sensed and subsurface data), and to deliver integrated content (e.g. urban underground infrastructure and geology). In this process, several hurdles must be overcome, i.e., developing standards, harmonization, integration of data, storing and sharing content in a structured manner, and developing services. In the process challenges are manifold, and so are the solutions.This session therefore is looking for contributions addressing the wide field of geological 3D-modelling and associated topics such as data modelling & data storage and sharing systems. We especially encourage the younger generation to present and are glad to announce a special block within the session that is dedicated to honor selected student degree theses and reward them with a cash prize. For more details please visit the website of the section Geoinformatics (www.fgi-dggv.de). 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm7.1-2 Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences
Session Chair: Melanie Kaliwoda, SNSB /LMU
Session Chair: Jörg Göttlicher, KIT

Spectroscopic methods with their capability to gain information on atoms and molecules are becoming more and more relevant in earth sciences in order to open up new fields of research and to solve problems in the various scientific disciplines. Therefore, it is important to have an exchange, which methods are especially suitable for different requirements. The session Spectroscopic methods in modern geosciences is addressed to all geoscientific researchers who use spectroscopic technologies such as Raman, Infrared (IR), UV/Vis, X-ray, Electron and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy as well as Mass spectrometry (MS). Also contributions of investigations that involve a spectroscopic method not listed here are highly welcome.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm15.1-1 Working on the roads: Improving the infrastructure for research into geo-societal challenges
Session Chair: Kirsten Elger, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

In response to the growing geo-societal challenges of our densely populated planet, current research frequently requires convergence of multiple research disciplines, and optimized use of openly available data, research facilities and funds. Especially the Earth and environmental sciences play a significant role in addressing these challenges, but require the integration of scientific data, software and tools from multiple, globally distributed resources to unlock their full potential to contribute. In addition, the number of Earth and environmental research data repositories and data portals has increased markedly, and so has their range of maturities and capabilities to integrate into the ecosystem of modern scientific communication. Efforts such as the FAIR Data Principles, the CoreTrustSeal Certification for the trustworthiness of research data repositories, and the Enabling FAIR Data Commitment Statement have raised our expectations towards the capabilities of research data repositories and infrastructures. Now we need to ensure that these expectations are met at all levels, from individual researchers, to data repositories, to research infrastructures. What are the challenges and appropriate strategies?This session invites contributions from different fields of expertise, including research infrastructure or data repository managers, data scientists, interdisciplinary researchers and policy makers. Our aim is to discuss perspectives, experiences, current or future challenges and potential solutions related to creating an effective infrastructure for the environmental and earth sciences. 

 
3:00pm - 3:15pmCoffee break
 
3:15pm - 4:00pmPlenary: The Future of Geodata Management – the UK experiences

Karen Hanghøj more information

 
4:00pm - 4:15pmCoffee break
 
4:15pm - 5:45pm13.1-2 European Raw Materials
Session Chair: Antje Wittenberg, BGR
Session Chair: Henrike Sievers, BGR

Raw Materials are crucial components of a resilient and sustainable economy and society. A sustainable supply of primary raw materials needs accessible mineral deposits and efficiently productive mines. Competing land-use issues, social and environmental challenges, declining ore grades, resource nationalism are just a few aspects, which seems to make it increasingly challenging to secure supplies. The realisation of a low-carbon society and new technologies – especially in the light of the "European Green Deal” – change future raw material needs and set a focus in so-called critical raw materials.Although Europe has a long history in mining, it is still widely underexplored in particular with modern exploration methods. A good understanding of mineral systems, mining sites and remaining resources of historical sites will stay of utmost importance.This session thus invites contributions focussing on European mineral deposits and exploration and mining activities that indicate a socio-economic importance to the German / European society in particular.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm9.1 Groundwater Availability: Current Trends and Challenges in Groundwater Resources Exploration and Management
Session Chair: Nico Goldscheider, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT)
Session Chair: Traugott Scheytt, TU Bergakademie Freiberg

Groundwater resources are critical for the freshwater supply of humanity, for drinking water purpose and agricultural irrigation. At the same time, many aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems are directly or indirectly dependent of groundwater. Climate change, population increase and the resulting changes in land use and water demand exert increasing pressure on these valuable but vulnerable groundwater resources, often resulting in declining water tables and spring discharge, saltwater intrusions in coastal aquifers, reduced environmental baseflow and, consequently, deterioration of ecosystems and water-use conflicts. This session addresses all aspects of groundwater availability, both at global scales and in relevant regional case studies, in different types of aquifers – unconsolidated aquifers, fractured rocks and karst aquifer systems, with a particular focus on the Alpine and Mediterranean regions. Contributions presenting new experimental, conceptual and modelling methods and tools to address different aspects of groundwater availability across all scales are also welcome.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm12.3 Geoscience and Society
Session Chair: Christian Bücker, CB Photography
Session Chair: Christoph Hilgers, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: Frank R. Schilling, KIT

Climate, energy transition, raw material supply, underground storage are socially relevant topics that require geoscientific expertise but are not associated with the geosciences. How do you bring topics from the geosciences into society? Geohazards such as earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, floods and volcanic eruptions are high-profile issues that geoscience experts contribute to in the media. Geoscientists in geoparks also develop active communication strategies to present geoscientific phenomena to society.The session will highlight ways in which the topics of climate, energy transition, raw material supply and underground storage can be linked to the geosciences in society.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm6.1-2 Applications in 3D Geological Modelling
Session Chair: Rouwen Johannes Lehné, HLNUG
Session Chair: Roland Baumberger, Swiss Geological Survey
Session Chair: Stephan Steuer, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe

Over the last decades, 3D geological modelling has become a standard in hydrocarbon exploration and production, has been adopted and is developing towards a systematic effort by geological surveys, and is on the verge of being able to properly handle the structurally complex settings in which the mining sector operates. New, exciting possibilities are arising and new application domains are opening up, which challenges geomodellers to integrate data and methods from different domains (e.g. remote-sensed and subsurface data), and to deliver integrated content (e.g. urban underground infrastructure and geology). In this process, several hurdles must be overcome, i.e., developing standards, harmonization, integration of data, storing and sharing content in a structured manner, and developing services. In the process challenges are manifold, and so are the solutions.This session therefore is looking for contributions addressing the wide field of geological 3D-modelling and associated topics such as data modelling & data storage and sharing systems. We especially encourage the younger generation to present and are glad to announce a special block within the session that is dedicated to honor selected student degree theses and reward them with a cash prize. For more details please visit the website of the section Geoinformatics (www.fgi-dggv.de). 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm19.1-1 Regional geology: A key for answering questions in geoscience
Session Chair: Guido Meinhold, Keele University
Session Chair: Jan Golonka, AGH University of Science and Technology
Session Chair: Jonas Kley, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Session Chair: Heinz-Gerd Röhling, DGGV

Regional geology is an essential cornerstone of geoscience, encompassing multiple geological disciplines to study important geological features of a region. The size and the borders of each region are usually defined by distinct geological boundaries and by the occurrence of a specific suite of geologic rock strata. Regional geology is used to solve a wide range of questions in geoscience and provides important information in the search for natural resources. This broad session offers the opportunity to explore the diversity of methods and approaches used to study regional geology and how information about regional geology is made available and transferred to the geoscience community in academia, industry, government, or the public. We welcome contributions on all aspects of geology that contribute to better understanding regional geology on Earth or other terrestrial planets. 

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm15.1-2 Working on the roads: Improving the infrastructure for research into geo-societal challenges
Session Chair: Kirsten Elger, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

In response to the growing geo-societal challenges of our densely populated planet, current research frequently requires convergence of multiple research disciplines, and optimized use of openly available data, research facilities and funds. Especially the Earth and environmental sciences play a significant role in addressing these challenges, but require the integration of scientific data, software and tools from multiple, globally distributed resources to unlock their full potential to contribute. In addition, the number of Earth and environmental research data repositories and data portals has increased markedly, and so has their range of maturities and capabilities to integrate into the ecosystem of modern scientific communication. Efforts such as the FAIR Data Principles, the CoreTrustSeal Certification for the trustworthiness of research data repositories, and the Enabling FAIR Data Commitment Statement have raised our expectations towards the capabilities of research data repositories and infrastructures. Now we need to ensure that these expectations are met at all levels, from individual researchers, to data repositories, to research infrastructures. What are the challenges and appropriate strategies?This session invites contributions from different fields of expertise, including research infrastructure or data repository managers, data scientists, interdisciplinary researchers and policy makers. Our aim is to discuss perspectives, experiences, current or future challenges and potential solutions related to creating an effective infrastructure for the environmental and earth sciences. 

 
5:45pm - 6:00pmCoffee break
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 1.5, 1.8
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topic: 1.9
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 4.2, 5.3
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 6.1, 6.2, 8.3
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 9.1, 9.3, 12.1, 12.3, 13.1, 13.3
 
6:00pm - 7:30pmPoster session for Topics: 14.1, 14.2, 15.1, 19.1, 19.2
 
Date: Thursday, 23/Sept/2021
9:00am - 9:30amEGW - Welcome & Geothermal @ KIT

Welcome & Geothermal @ KIT

 
9:00am - 10:30am2.3 Geo-bio-interaction in oceanic hydrothermal systems
Session Chair: Esther Martina Schwarzenbach, Freie Universität Berlin
Session Chair: Wolfgang Bach, Universität Bremen

Hydrothermal vents in deep and shallow ocean environments are geochemical conduits that link Earth’s interior with the oceans. These sites of active hydrothermal vents are distributed throughout the global network of ocean ridge spreading centers to ridge flanks and cool off-axis diffuse vent fields in ocean basins and occur in diverse lithological settings – including basalts, ultramafic rocks and sediments – and temperature regimes. These vents are loaded with nutrients from hydrothermal and magmatic activity that drive a vast sub-seafloor biosphere. Particularly near ocean ridge spreading centers magmatism and/or residual mantle heat serve as drivers for abiogenic mineral reactions generating reduced chemical species, which can be utilized by chemolithoautotrophic microbes. Additionally, microbial chemosynthesis within fluids drives near-vent productivity and support animal communities that inhabit these ecosystems. Water-rock-microbe interaction within the oceanic lithosphere considerably affects ocean water chemistry and the chemical composition of the oceanic lithosphere, effectively controlling global element cycles. This session seeks to combine new findings from a multi-disciplinary research community investigating the complex interplays between hydrothermal, magmatic and microbial processes in ocean floor settings, the diversity and extent of the shallow and deep subsurface biosphere, life in extreme environments, or their impact on global geochemical cycles. We also welcome contributions that study ongoing alteration processes and microbial activity in continental crust or oceanic lithosphere exposed on land, or ancient processes preserved in ophiolite sequences, from modern to Archaean systems. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am5.1 The imprint of astronomical climate forcing: geochronometer and paleoclimate archive
Session Chair: Christian Zeeden, Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics
Session Chair: Stefanie Kaboth-Bahr, University of Potsdam

The pacing of the global climate system by variations in orbital parameters is clearly demonstrated in the timing and specific patterns of various geoarchives, including sapropels, glacial/interglacial cycles and many other examples. The imprint of astronomical cycles can be used as high-precision geochronometer, and as paleoclimatic information. Extreme events can especially be expected to relate to extremes in insolation. We invite contributions utilizing the imprint of Milankovic cycles as preserved in the geological record in any way, including the often poorly understood mechanisms that translate this forcing into geoarchives. Submissions exploring orbital time scales, proxy data and/or modelling work are welcome; we aim to bring together studies focused on global and regional climate responses to astronomical forcing at different time scales.

 
9:00am - 10:30am12.1-1 Communication geosciences and higher education teaching
Session Chair: Malte Junge, Mineralogische Staatssammlung München (SNSB-MSM) / LMU München
Session Chair: Sylke Hlawatsch, RichardHallmann-Schule

Geoscientific questions are increasingly relevant in our daily life. However, the public awareness of geoscientific topics is very limited. Therefore, it is important to inverse the visibility of geoscientific challenges and solutions in our society. Communicating geosciences to a broader audience implies the use of innovative strategies for public outreach. We have to encourage kids to become enthusiastic about geoscientific topics already in schools and leisure activities such as museums. Besides public outreach and school education, we also need to motivate geosciences students to address geoscientific challenges to the public. The current situation with the worldwide digital teaching atmosphere brings varies challenges but also opportunities in optimizing e-learning methods in the higher education teaching including digital field trips, microscopy inspire other digital lectures. The aim of this session is to discuss and report on existing and future initiatives as well as connecting people with similar motivation.

 
9:00am - 10:30am19.1-2 Regional geology: A key for answering questions in geoscience
Session Chair: Guido Meinhold, Keele University
Session Chair: Jan Golonka, AGH University of Science and Technology
Session Chair: Jonas Kley, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Session Chair: Heinz-Gerd Röhling, DGGV

Regional geology is an essential cornerstone of geoscience, encompassing multiple geological disciplines to study important geological features of a region. The size and the borders of each region are usually defined by distinct geological boundaries and by the occurrence of a specific suite of geologic rock strata. Regional geology is used to solve a wide range of questions in geoscience and provides important information in the search for natural resources. This broad session offers the opportunity to explore the diversity of methods and approaches used to study regional geology and how information about regional geology is made available and transferred to the geoscience community in academia, industry, government, or the public. We welcome contributions on all aspects of geology that contribute to better understanding regional geology on Earth or other terrestrial planets. 

 
9:00am - 10:30am14.1 Radon & Geology
Session Chair: Rouwen Johannes Lehné, HLNUG

With the 2013/59/EURATOM directive of the EU-Commission, the European member states were urged to update their radiation protection laws to account for the health risk of the exposure to elevated indoor radon levels and to prepare National Radon Action Plans (EC 2014). Following the directive, §121 of this Act states that areas shall be identified where the radon concentration (as an annual average) in a significant number of buildings is expected to exceed the national reference level of 300 B q /m³. The European member states have to provide information on these so called “radon priority areas” by the end of 2020. The basis for the identification of those areas will be the map of the geogenic radon potential. For many regions the currently available data is not sufficient to provide a satisfying accuracy though, which means that additional field measurements are needed. Doing so, the selection of sampling sites ideally reflects both 

1) the administrative level on which radon-priority areas will be delineated and

2) available knowledge about variability of landscape characteristics governing the geogenic radon potential. 

This session therefore is inviting contributions from the large field of action related to radon & geology. The topics include but are not limited to: 

  • What are your approaches in planning measurements?
  • Which methodological experiences did you collect (What works and what does not work)?
  • Which results and interpretations came up so far?
  • Temporal and spatial variability
  • Influence of local phenomena (e.g. tectonics)
  • From measurements to maps: how to predict spatially
  • ……. 
 
9:30am - 10:45amEGW - Assessment of Geothermal Resources
 
10:30am - 10:45amCoffee break
 
10:45am - 11:00amEGW - Break
 
10:45am - 12:00pmPanel Discussion: Grundwasser und Trinkwasser: Geht uns in Deutschland das Wasser aus?

Grundwasser gehört global zu den wichtigsten Wasserressourcen und trägt in Deutschland etwa 75% zur Trinkwasserversorgung bei, in Karlsruhe sogar 100%. In vielen Regionen weltweit wird Grundwasser auch in zunehmendem Umfang für die landwirtschaftliche Bewässerung genutzt, spielt also auch bei der Nahrungsmittelproduktion für die wachsende Weltbevölkerung eine wichtige Rolle. Grundwasser ist Teil des Wasserkreislaufs, speist Quellen, Bäche, Flüsse und Seen und ist entscheidend wichtig für viele Ökosysteme, woraus sich vielfältige Konflikte mit der menschlichen Nutzung ergeben. Der prognostizierte Klimawandel mit all seinen Unsicherheiten und die sich verändernde Landnutzung stellen für die Verfügbarkeit und Qualität der Grundwasserressourcen vielfältige Herausforderungen dar, wie beispielsweise die großflächige Kontamination mit Nitrat aus der Landwirtschaft, dramatische Abnahmen der Grundwasserstände in manchen Weltregionen aufgrund von Wasserentnahmen für die Bewässerung, sowie veränderte und teils schwer prognostizierbare Änderungen der Grundwasserneubildung durch den Klimawandel. Diese und andere Herausforderungen werden in einer Runde von Hydrogeologen und anderen Fachleuten aus der universitären Forschung, der beruflichen Praxis und von zuständigen Behörden diskutiert.

Organizer: Fachsektion Hydrogeologie der DGGV

• Prof. Dr. Traugott Scheytt, TU Freiberg, Vorsitzender FH-DGGV

• Prof. Dr. Nico Goldscheider, KIT

Moderator: Lioba Virchow, GFZ Potsdam 

Panel Members:

• Prof. Nico Goldscheider, KIT

• Prof. Matthias Maier, Stadtwerke Karlsruhe

• Prof. Maria-Theresia Schafmeister, Uni Greifswald

• Dr. Klaus Schnell, ERM

• Thomas Walter, Umweltministerium Saarland

 
11:00am - 11:15amEGW - Constructing Geothermal Wells
 
11:15am - 11:45amEGW - Resource Development
 
11:45am - 12:00pmEGW - Energy Conversion Systems
 
12:00pm - 12:45pmAwards

Gustav-Steinmann-Medaille 2021: Prof. Mark Richard Handy

Leopold-von-Buch-Plakette 2021: Prof. Eduard Garzanti

Rolf+Marlies Teichmüller Preis 2021: Dr. Jochen Rascher

 
12:00pm - 1:00pmEGW - Lunch
 
12:45pm - 1:30pmBreak
 
12:45pm - 1:30pmIndustry Event
 
1:00pm - 1:45pmEGW - Keynote: Martin Blomendal
 
1:30pm - 3:00pm2.2 Earth’s sustainable mantle
Session Chair: Stephan Koenig, University of Tuebingen
Session Chair: Maria Kirchenbaur, Leibniz Universität Hannover
Session Chair: Ernst Kiefer, KIT AGW

The mantle is Earth’s largest silicate reservoir and one of its fundamental characteristics is the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity that extends down to the mineral scale. These various-sized mantle domains reflect different proportions of multiple, superimposed depletion and enrichment events that affected the mantle in time and space. As such, each of these domains may therefore retain different and potentially unique information regarding the extent of mantle depletion as well as the role and nature of enrichment by crustal recycling. Owing to the reaction with other surface reservoirs before subduction, mantle domains that were enriched by recycled crust may additionally record ancient ocean-atmospheric conditions. The sustainable mantle thus maintains a certain rate of exchange between Earth’s interior and exterior, stores compositional heterogeneities that relate to this exchange and partly mirror global conditions of ancient Earth’s surface. This session welcomes contributions that address different scales, features and implications of the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of the mantle, its role for geological resources and the perspective of mantle and mantle-derived components to elucidate ancient surface conditions that shaped a habitable planet over time.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm5.3 Advances in terrestrial and marine carbonate archives – novel proxies and innovative techniques to decipher past climate variability
Session Chair: Dana Felicitas Christine Riechelmann, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Session Chair: Maximilian Hansen, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Session Chair: Sophie Warken, Heidelberg University
Session Chair: Michael Weber, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz

The use of carbonate-based paleoclimate archives has gained increasing importance to obtain reliable and detailed information on past climate and environmental variability in order to better understand the modern climate regime and the influence of anthropogenically induced global warming. In the last decades, the diversity of geochemical proxies available in carbonate palaeoclimate archives have emerged rapidly and significantly. Trace elements and traditional stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon have been supplemented with numerous non-traditional stable isotope systems such as B, Li, Ba, Mg, Ca, Sr, U, N, Δ17O, Δ47.In addition, the study of organic matter in carbonaceous archives and investigation of different biomarkers has massively expanded over the last years. Most importantly, recent developments in analytical techniques allow for improved precision, unprecedented resolution or smallest sample amounts. Furthermore, sophisticated isotope enabled diffusion-reaction models as well as high resolution experimental approaches significantly improved our understanding of the underlying fractionation processes. All these novel geochemical proxies and innovative methods open new advances towards qualitative and quantitative reconstruction in terrestrial and marine palaeoclimate studies and allow for multi-proxy approaches at different spatial and temporal scales.This session aims to bring together researchers from different fields of palaeoclimate research to share their knowledge, and allow inter-disciplinary exchange in order to apply these proxies to other palaeoclimate archives. We especially invite early career researcher to submit their abstracts to this interdisciplinary session. This will inspire both young researcher as well as senior scientists to apply new multi-proxy research approaches to study past climate variability. 

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm12.1-2 Communication geosciences and higher education teaching
Session Chair: Malte Junge, Mineralogische Staatssammlung München (SNSB-MSM) / LMU München
Session Chair: Sylke Hlawatsch, RichardHallmann-Schule

Geoscientific questions are increasingly relevant in our daily life. However, the public awareness of geoscientific topics is very limited. Therefore, it is important to inverse the visibility of geoscientific challenges and solutions in our society. Communicating geosciences to a broader audience implies the use of innovative strategies for public outreach. We have to encourage kids to become enthusiastic about geoscientific topics already in schools and leisure activities such as museums. Besides public outreach and school education, we also need to motivate geosciences students to address geoscientific challenges to the public. The current situation with the worldwide digital teaching atmosphere brings varies challenges but also opportunities in optimizing e-learning methods in the higher education teaching including digital field trips, microscopy inspire other digital lectures. The aim of this session is to discuss and report on existing and future initiatives as well as connecting people with similar motivation.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm19.2-1 Early Earth – geodynamics, environments, & the emergence of life
Session Chair: Jan-Peter Duda, Eberhard-Karls-University Tübingen
Session Chair: René Heller, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research
Session Chair: Carsten Münker, Universität zu Köln
Session Chair: Joachim Reitner, University of Göttingen

The session is financially supported by the DFG 1833 "Building a Habitable Earth".

From geodynamic processes to the long-term diversification of life – through geologic time, our planet has been influenced by a wide variety of forces. This session seeks to explore life, environment, and solid Earth in a planetary and astrophysical context. In particular, we are interested in processes that have shaped our Planet in deep time. We invite submissions across diverse disciplines – also beyond the Earth sciences – and welcome a wide range of contributions, including field and rock-based surveys, analytical studies, experimental work, and/or modelling approaches.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm14.2-1 Post-mining: Opportunities and challenges
Session Chair: Dennis Quandt, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: Tobias Rudolph, Technische Hochschule Georg Agricola (THGA)
Session Chair: Christoph Hilgers, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

After the closure of mines in Germany, former districts are nowadays subject to changes, which may require geomonitoring. This concerns the mine water management in particular as pumping of mine water in the abandoned mines is technically not necessary anymore. As a result of the controlled mine water rebound, fluid pore pressures in subsurface rocks increase and may alter the stress state of the subsurface rocks. The increased pore pressures may result in geomechanical changes in the deeper subsurface around the mine. This may result in ground movements and micro-seismic events, which may be measured on the surface. Post-mining also provides an opportunity for post-usage, such as new natural (geo)heritage sites or geothermal energy. Thus, centuries-long active mining produced a wealth of geological, geodetic, geophysical, and geomechanical data. Based on such multidisciplinary data, interdisciplinary geological models and technical solutions can be developed and applied to different mining areas worldwide where active mining has been closed. This session invites contributions from different scientific disciplines that study the processes that undergo in post-mining areas in Germany and globally. Among others, this may include geology investigating sediment or rock properties and structures on different scales, geophysics detecting fluid-induced micro-seismic events and studying stress fields, and geomonitoring of ground movements or gas emissions. It may address strategies to improve land rehabilitation above and below ground.

 
1:30pm - 3:00pm9.4-1 Hydrogeology of arid environments
Session Chair: Stephan Schulz, TU Darmstadt
Session Chair: Nils Michelsen, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Most (semi-)arid regions are characterized by limited surface water and hence rely on other sources. While unconventional resources such as desalinated seawater can be a valuable option for domestic supply in coastal areas, groundwater withdrawal is still the only relevant option to produce volumes that can satisfy the demand of water-intensive sectors, above all irrigated agriculture.In many areas, however, groundwater resources are over-exploited, i.e., more water is abstracted from the aquifers than is naturally replenished. Considering global changes such as population and economic growth, and the predicted expansion of dry areas due to climate changes (e.g. in the Circum-Mediterranean region), the pressure on groundwater resources will be even amplified.This situation calls for a better water management, which is in turn dependent on an adequate hydrogeological understanding comprising both, available quantities and water quality. We hence envisage a session that covers a broad spectrum of hydrogeological aspects of (semi-)arid environments. Sub-topics could include, but are not limited to, groundwater recharge estimations, flow modelling, hydrochemical studies, and isotope applications. Interdisciplinary contributions, linking hydrogeology to neighboring disciplines, are encouraged. 

 
1:45pm - 2:30pmEGW - Operation of Geothermal Systems
 
2:30pm - 2:45pmEGW - Break
 
2:45pm - 4:00pmEGW - New geothermal utilization schemes
 
3:00pm - 3:15pmCoffee break
 
3:15pm - 4:00pmPlenary: Relative Importance of Climate and Humans on Water Storage Changes using GRACE Satellite Data

Bridget R. Scanlon more information

 
4:00pm - 4:15pmCoffee break
 
4:00pm - 4:15pmEGW - Break
 
4:15pm - 5:00pmEGW - Poster (1472, 1473, 1498, 1483, 1500)
 
4:15pm - 5:45pmThur_3_1
 
4:15pm - 5:45pm5.2 Geological archives and proxies of polar environmental change: Data basis for constraining numerical simulations
Session Chair: Johann Philipp Klages, Alfred-Wegener-Institut Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung
Session Chair: Juliane Müller, Alfred Wegener Institute

In recent years, geoscientific data provided considerable insights into the environmental past of polar regions. Conventional coring, seafloor drilling, and terrestrial campaigns led to increasing data availability of past environmental and ice-sheet change at both poles. As these are the regions most sensitively reacting to climatic changes, reliable datasets of past variations are critical for constraining numerical models aiming at simulating future changes more robustly. We therefore invite contributions from colleagues working in marine and terrestrial settings in both polar regions on various timescales. We particularly ask for contributions that integrate field data with numerical modeling, i.e. utilize past variations as target values for calibrating numerical simulations in order to improve their predictive capabilities for future scenarios.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm12.2 Sustainable use of geological resources in geopark areas
Session Chair: Henning Zellmer, Geopark Harz, Braunschweiger Land, Ostfalen
Session Chair: Volker Wilde, Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum
Session Chair: Heinz-Gerd Röhling, DGGV

In addition to the world cultural and natural heritage and biosphere reserves, Geoparks were established as a third category by UNESCO in 2015. Since then, the claim has been formulated to develop UNESCO Geoparks into model areas for sustainable development. Unlike in large protected areas, where the use of resources is largely prevented, in geoparks it is more about the sustainable use of geological resources. A key aspect in geoparks is sustainable regional development, which on the one hand ensures the use of resources for future generations and on the other hand does not lose sight of nature conservation and climate goals. The spectrum of conflicting goals to be resolved ranges from groundwater protection to sand, gravel and solid rock mining, energy generation and storage including geothermal energy, to the dumping of nuclear waste and other waste materials in the geological subsurface. Last but not least, the recultivation or renaturation or subsequent use of former open-cast mining areas is one of the currently pending fields of action.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm19.2-2 Early Earth – geodynamics, environments, & the emergence of life
Session Chair: Jan-Peter Duda, Eberhard-Karls-University Tübingen
Session Chair: René Heller, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research
Session Chair: Carsten Münker, Universität zu Köln
Session Chair: Joachim Reitner, University of Göttingen

The session is financially supported by the DFG 1833 "Building a Habitable Earth".

From geodynamic processes to the long-term diversification of life – through geologic time, our planet has been influenced by a wide variety of forces. This session seeks to explore life, environment, and solid Earth in a planetary and astrophysical context. In particular, we are interested in processes that have shaped our Planet in deep time. We invite submissions across diverse disciplines – also beyond the Earth sciences – and welcome a wide range of contributions, including field and rock-based surveys, analytical studies, experimental work, and/or modelling approaches.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm14.2-2 Post-mining: Opportunities and challenges
Session Chair: Dennis Quandt, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Session Chair: Tobias Rudolph, Technische Hochschule Georg Agricola (THGA)
Session Chair: Christoph Hilgers, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

After the closure of mines in Germany, former districts are nowadays subject to changes, which may require geomonitoring. This concerns the mine water management in particular as pumping of mine water in the abandoned mines is technically not necessary anymore. As a result of the controlled mine water rebound, fluid pore pressures in subsurface rocks increase and may alter the stress state of the subsurface rocks. The increased pore pressures may result in geomechanical changes in the deeper subsurface around the mine. This may result in ground movements and micro-seismic events, which may be measured on the surface. Post-mining also provides an opportunity for post-usage, such as new natural (geo)heritage sites or geothermal energy. Thus, centuries-long active mining produced a wealth of geological, geodetic, geophysical, and geomechanical data. Based on such multidisciplinary data, interdisciplinary geological models and technical solutions can be developed and applied to different mining areas worldwide where active mining has been closed. This session invites contributions from different scientific disciplines that study the processes that undergo in post-mining areas in Germany and globally. Among others, this may include geology investigating sediment or rock properties and structures on different scales, geophysics detecting fluid-induced micro-seismic events and studying stress fields, and geomonitoring of ground movements or gas emissions. It may address strategies to improve land rehabilitation above and below ground.

 
4:15pm - 5:45pm9.4-2 Hydrogeology of arid environments
Session Chair: Stephan Schulz, TU Darmstadt
Session Chair: Nils Michelsen, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Most (semi-)arid regions are characterized by limited surface water and hence rely on other sources. While unconventional resources such as desalinated seawater can be a valuable option for domestic supply in coastal areas, groundwater withdrawal is still the only relevant option to produce volumes that can satisfy the demand of water-intensive sectors, above all irrigated agriculture.In many areas, however, groundwater resources are over-exploited, i.e., more water is abstracted from the aquifers than is naturally replenished. Considering global changes such as population and economic growth, and the predicted expansion of dry areas due to climate changes (e.g. in the Circum-Mediterranean region), the pressure on groundwater resources will be even amplified.This situation calls for a better water management, which is in turn dependent on an adequate hydrogeological understanding comprising both, available quantities and water quality. We hence envisage a session that covers a broad spectrum of hydrogeological aspects of (semi-)arid environments. Sub-topics could include, but are not limited to, groundwater recharge estimations, flow modelling, hydrochemical studies, and isotope applications. Interdisciplinary contributions, linking hydrogeology to neighboring disciplines, are encouraged. 

 
5:45pm - 6:00pmDGGV Young Scientist Award for best talk and best poster; Closing ceremony
 
Date: Friday, 24/Sept/2021
9:00am - 9:45amEGW - Keynote: Friedemann Samrock
 
9:45am - 11:00amEGW - Exploration of Geothermal Reservoirs
 
11:00am - 11:15amEGW - Break
 
11:15am - 12:00pmEGW - Poster (1459, 1495, 1477, 1492, 1499, 1501)
 
12:00pm - 1:00pmEGW - Lunch
 
1:00pm - 1:45pmEGW - Keynote: David McNamara
 
1:45pm - 2:45pmEGW - Sustainability, Environment and Regulatory Framework
 
2:45pm - 3:00pmEGW - Break
 
3:00pm - 4:15pmEGW - Computing and Data Management, Machine Learning
 
4:15pm - 4:30pmEGW - Closing Remarks & Prize