Conference Agenda

Overview and details of the sessions of this conference. Please select a date or location to show only sessions at that day or location. Please select a single session for detailed view (with abstracts and downloads if available).

Please note that all times are shown in the time zone of the conference. The current conference time is: 18th Jan 2022, 05:54:57am CET

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Session Overview
Date: Thursday, 01/July/2021
4:00pm - 5:30pmDudley Seers Lecture by Rohini Pande (Yale University)

Since 2008, the Dudley Seers Lecture has been an inherent part of the EADI General Conferences. Remembering one of the founding members and the first EADI president, this lecture allows a renowned speaker to formally set the tone for the debates at and around the conference.

Mapping Power and Inequality: Institutions and Individuals

Today, the majority of the world’s extreme poor live in lower middle-income countries. In these countries, the persistence of poverty increasingly reflects unequal access to economic opportunities and low levels of redistribution. Within these countries, poverty is increasingly concentrated in rural communities and among ethnic minorities. And, within households, women and girls often receive a lower share of economic resources. This persists even though most of these countries are electoral democracies with universal suffrage. In this talk, Rohini Pande will explore how institutional form impacts the well-being of the poor and vulnerable when patterns of economic growth do not directly provide these groups adequate economic resources. She will focus on two institutions – the family and the state.

 
Date: Friday, 02/July/2021
12:00pm - 1:00pmTechnical information session
Session Chair: Dr. Kees Biekart, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Sushrutha Vemuri, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The

Are you unsure about how to use Zoom? Would you like to meet a few friendly faces before the start of the conference? Would you like to discover new and useful features in Zoom? Do you have a technical question? Then join one of our three training sessions! Our team will be happy to assist you.

 
2:00pm - 4:00pm"From Abstract To Vlog" : A Pre-Conference Workshop
Session Chair: Dr. Emanuele Fantini, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Adinda Ceelen, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Roland Postma, Moviorola, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Juliette Cortes, IHE Delft, Netherlands, The

In this hands-on workshop you will learn to exploit the power of video and of storytelling to effectively communicate your research with a vlog (a short video recorded with your mobile phone).

With the help of a professional video-maker and science communicators, you will be guided through: i) the basic elements of storytelling and the development of a storyline, ii) the recording and editing a of a vlog and iii) the dissemination of your vlog through social media.

At the end of the workshop you will have a vlog ready to share in order to boost the visibility of your research during the digital EADI-ISS conference and beyond.

 

 
Date: Monday, 05/July/2021
12:30pm - 1:30pm17th Development Dialogue (ISS PhD Conference) - "Engaged Scholarship for Development: Building Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice"

17th Development Dialogue on “Engaged Scholarship for Development: Building Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice”

The Development Dialogue (DD) is an annual international PhD conference organized by the PhD candidates at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague. The objective is to exchange the results of recent and ongoing research by young scholars and doctoral candidates in different fields of development studies. Development Dialogue is a multidisciplinary, reflective and collaborative exercise which brings together researchers from around the world.

As a participant in the EADI ISS conference, you are also welcome to attend the DD sessions. Please check the programme here: 17th Development Dialogue - International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) (b2b-wizard.com) 

Important note: The DD is not organised by the same team as the EADI ISS conference. For any question relating to DD events please email dd17@iss.nl  

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmEurope Network Sessions
Session Chair: Susanne von Itter, European Association of Development Research Institutes EADI, Germany
Session Chair: Prof. Wil Hout, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

The regional network session on Europe aims to strengthen regional networking by taking advantage of the online conference setting. The session welcomes researchers and representatives of institutes from this region and/or participants with a similar regional focus so that personal networks can be expanded.

EADI aims to create a community of scholars focusing on development research at the regional level. In the session, we will examine the need for creating regional networking bodies, which could for example hold (online) meetings in between general conference years. The sessions will be moderated by members of the EADI Executive Committee and co-moderated by ISS research team leaders.

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmTechnical Assistance Room - 11am-5pm

If you are unable to reach the technical room through the Zoom Link, please write to us at eadi2021@iss.nl. You can also reach the technical room by Telephone:

Phone: +31616801052

WhatsApp: +31616801052

 
1:45pm - 2:00pmBreak
 
2:00pm - 3:15pmEADI-ISS Opening Plenary: Global Solidarity and Covid-19

Inge Hutter – ISS Rector; Professor of Participatory and Qualitative Research in Population and Development (The Netherlands)

Henning Melber - EADI President (Sweden)

Kees Biekart (chair) – EADI/ISS (The Netherlands)

Panellists:

Sreerekha Sathi - Assistant Professor of Gender and Political Economy, International Institute of Social Studies

Patricia Mendonça - Associate Professor of Public Policy, Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades (EACH), Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

Danny Sriskandarajah - CEO of Oxfam GB (United Kingdom)

Melissa Leach - Director of the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex (United Kingdom)

This plenary session is the opening of the EADI-ISS Conference 2021 Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice by the President of EADI and the Rector of the ISS. This will be followed by a panel discussion on the question: How has the Covid pandemic affected Global Solidarity? And how has the practice of solidarity (the core theme of this conference) changed our view on global transformations?

More information about the speakers here: Opening Plenary, 5 July, 2-3.15 pm | EADI

 
3:15pm - 3:30pmBreak
 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-HP002: Tackling Child Labour in the Global South
Session Chair: Dr. Pedro Goulart, CAPP, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Session Chair: Dr. Nina Schneider, Centre for Global Cooperation Research, Germany

Child labour in the global south is pervasive and cross-cuts geographies. This practice undermines the right of a child to “develop in the best possible way” and denies equal opportunities within and across countries. Well-intended top-down policies have often neglected the voice of children. With social justice threatened, solidarity is fundamental to overcome the challenges. This interdisciplinary panel aims to discuss past and present child labour policies in the global south asking: What are past and current conditions of children’s work and schooling? What have been the most effective policies? How can we envision the future?

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-HP091: Volunteering, Solidarity and Development
Session Chair: Prof. Matt Baillie Smith, Northumbria University, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Chris Millora, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

This panel explores the relationship between volunteering, solidarity and development. Volunteering and development debates have been dominated by a focus on international volunteers from the global North, marginalising diverse forms of volunteering within and between global South settings and their multiple and contested relationships to development. This panel moves beyond a focus on how volunteering promotes development to explore what kind of development volunteering facilitates and for whom. To reflect more diverse volunteering experiences, the panel will explore volunteering’s relationship to efforts to build trust across different scales, struggles for peace and social justice, and responses to the climate emergency.

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-RT041: The Legal Mobilization Project: Analyzing Law-Based Advocacy
Session Chair: Dr. Jeff Handmaker, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

This roundtable session, which is part of a larger project, will explore the potential for legal mobilization as a legitimate means to hold governments and private actors accountable for human rights, environmental and other legal violations. Legal mobilization should be contrasted with lawfare, whereby companies, as well as liberal and authoritarian regimes have engaged in state capture of democratic institutions, victimized and attempted to bankrupt social justice advocates and organizations and have otherwise instrumentalized the rule of law in an illegitimate manner. We regard legal mobilization as a legitimate form of law-based, and mostly rights-based civic advocacy. Drawing on different case studies of legal mobilization and ways of studying it, we each adopt a critical relationship between law and other fields and disciplines and explain why strategic thinking is essential to realizing social justice and political equality.

The main innovations of our Legal Mobilization project are: (1) the different analytical approaches we apply to study how legal mobilization has the potential to address structural transformation; (2) the diverse empirical range of topics, actors, institutions and levels we will study in critical and comparative perspective and (3) our active engagement between both the scholarly study and the practice of legal mobilization. Evaluating the potential of legal mobilization has been understudied, particularly in relation to its socially transformative character. The research in this area mainly comprises: social movement-based studies of law-based advocacy, studies on how legal mobilization is justified and managed and political ecology approaches. Building on this existing literature, though taking different approaches, we will reflect on our published and preliminary research in this emerging research area of legal mobilization in relation to diverse topics such as economic and social rights protection, international criminal justice, regulation of financial flows to criminal organisations, environmental protection, access to social security and water security.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr. Nathanael Tilahun Ali is an assistant professor in public international in the Erasmus School of Law of Erasmus University Rotterdam

Dr. Gaetano Best is a practising advocate in Suriname who has conducted research on Fair and Accurate Fact-Finding in Dutch Atrocity Crimes Cases.

Dr. Jackie Dugard is an associate professor in the School of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa

Dr. Jeff Handmaker is an assistant professor in law, human rights and development at the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Ms. Thandiwe Matthews is an admitted attorney in the High Court of South Africa and a PhD candidate in a joint programme at the University of the Witwatersrand and the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Dr. Daphina Misiedjan is an assistant professor of human rights at the International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Dr. Frederike de Vlaming is a senior researcher in the War Reparations Centre, which forms part of the Amsterdam Centre for International Law at the University of Amsterdam and is Executive Director of the Nuhanovic Foundation.

Dr. Margarethe Wewerinke-Singh is an assistant professor of public international law at the School of Law, Leiden University.

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-RTB47: Transformative Education for a Just and Sustainable Future
Session Chair: Patricija Virtic, SLOGA, Slovenia, Slovenia
Session Chair: Dr. Talia Vela-Eiden, EADI/Bridge 47, Germany

Transformative education is education that fosters engaged, active and critical learners and builds constructive and democratic approaches to difference. Target 4.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals describes education as transformative when it is value-based and designed to promote global citizenship, sustainable development, human rights, gender equality, peace and appreciation of cultural diversity. 

In this participatory session, organized by Bridge 47, we will explore what role transformative education can play in responding to the global challenges, risks and trends of the future, and what capacities, skills and knowledge are needed to cope with the changing realities. We will discuss what role transformative education, as captured in SDG Target 4.7, plays in preparing us to cope with and respond to our new realities. Together we will look for steps we can already take now in order to help us better prepare for the future. 

Confirmed Speakers:

Rilli Lappalainen - Director Finish Development NGOs FINGO and Bridge 47

Tereza Cajkova - Independent consultant and researcher

Robert Jjuuko - Educationist, Researcher and Development Consultant, International Council for Adult Education ICAE

Jyotsna Mohan - Regional Coordinator, Asia Development Alliance 

Su-Ming Khoo - Professor, National University of Ireland Galway

Moderator:

Susanne von Itter - EADI

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-SP001: Water Governance and the Rise of Global Hydro-hubs as Developmental Actors
Session Chair: Dr. Farhad Mukhtarov, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Corinne Ong, NUS, Singapore
Session Chair: Prof. Des Gasper, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The

This panel discusses the rise of Global Hydro-Hubs (GHHs) as part of an on-going scramble for new water-related markets and considers the implications for global solidarity for development. With climate change effects on the rise, demand for water governance expertise soars around the world. This demand offers lucrative business opportunities and various countries have sought to brand themselves as GHHs. GHHs often receive policy support from their home nations and cities, which lend legitimacy to their existence and purpose. However, as GHHs seek to expand their influence, possible tensions between global solidarity for development, geo-political and economic incentives remain understudied and require attention through the lens of critical policy research.  

GHHs are nations and cities that brand themselves as centers of excellence in water engineering, management and governance and, by implication, as a natural choice for future clients to turn to with water-related problems. Countries such as USA, UK, The Netherlands, Israel, China, South Korea and Singapore have sought to be seen as GHHs. Aggressive branding, extensive networking and implementation of projects on the ground are some of the strategies that GHHs use to set foot in the new markets. A key narrative that enables the rise of GHHs is the possibility of a “triple-win”, that is, a) promote development by helping client countries solve water issues; b) bring profits to a GHH; and c) advance the geopolitical profile of a GHH as a reliable development partner. Whether the “triple-win” is possible in practice remains an empirical question. We invite conceptual and empirical contributions that reflect any of the issues raised above. More specifically, we invite future panelists to submit papers and/or prepare presentations that react to one or more of the following questions.

  1. Are the triple goals of achieving economic spin-offs, asserting a geopolitical stature and advancing global public goods, such as sustained peace and social justice, compatible with each other?
  2. What are the major elements, processes, and mechanisms through which GHHs brand their water sector internationally? Such strategies may include but are not limited to: presenting external demand for GHH services as “natural”, packaging past domestic achievements as globally relevant, asserting universality of the GHH expertise, stressing political neutrality of a GHH
  3. What are the processes and outcomes of water planning and management projects on the ground that have been implemented with support and/or funding by GHHs as part of a larger strategy of branding and merchandising their water sector?
  4. What are the larger implications of the rise of GHHs for water governance expertise and its mobility, especially with regard to achieving the water related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?
 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-SP063: Rethinking Development: Creative Responses to Economic Injustice in Developing Economies
Session Chair: Dr. Kelly Elizabeth Dye, Acadia University, Canada
Session Chair: Dr. Bruce Grant Dye, Crest Business Development Ltd., Canada

Responses to social injustice, particularly to economic injustice and resulting poverty, vary from income redistribution strategies to programs and policies aimed at reducing employment barriers to marginalised groups. Despite such efforts, this injustice continues to grow, with “inequality getting much worse, heightening the economic precarity of the poor” (Cummings, 2017, p. 37). This Seed Panel provides a platform to present works in progress, draft papers, and / or innovative ideas that explore approaches to development that address such social and economic injustice from the perspectives of those working at the individual and community levels. This may include non-traditional, unique, or experimental approaches, experiences, or programs aimed at helping individuals and communities improve their circumstances within a system that is economically and socially unjust. Abstracts chosen for the panel will require a presentation as a final submission.

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-SP088: Building Social Justice and Solidarity through the Politics of Urban Social Transformation
Session Chair: Dr. Marianne Millstein, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway
Session Chair: Berit Aasen, NIBR, OsloMet, Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Tom Goodfellow, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Catherine Sutherland, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa, South Africa

This panel explores the politics of urban social transformation in the global South, meaning transformation that aims at reducing inequalities and strengthening solidarity for a socially just city. Cities are now firmly on the global development agenda, but realizing the ambitious goals embedded in the urban SDG and ‘New Urban Agenda’ is a difficult task. To tackle the range of urban challenges we face requires better understanding the politics and power structures that enable and constrain forms of activism and agency. This panel therefore explores the potential for urban citizenship, networks and activism to generate urban solidarity and social justice.

EADI Working Group: Urban Governance

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm1-SP145: Sexuality and Development
Session Chair: Brenda Rodríguez, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Chitrakshi Vashisht, International Institute of Social Studies the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Silke Heumann, EUR, Netherlands, The

Sexuality has been largely overlooked in mainstream development studies and practice (Cornwall and Jolly, 2006; Correa and Jolly, 2008). But sexuality relates and intersect with other areas of our lives, from religion to social rules, from the economy to political struggles. However, sexuality has been predominantly explored in a negative and limited way. Research on HIV/AIDS, population control, STI, etc. are some examples of this perspective wherein sexuality is seen as something dangerous that has to be contained and managed. Moreover, most of the research on sexuality also fails to recognize it as an intersectional issue and thereby is dominated by a gender binary (man/woman) and even a sexual binary (homosexuality/heterosexuality). Post-colonial and decolonial feminists have problematized these mainstream development views on sexuality (Harcourt and Icaza, 2014). Similarly, other research has further argued the importance of sexuality in development and considers it is an important category of analysis that intersects with class, caste, race, gender, political status etc. and that ultimately has an impact on social justice including but not limiting to sexual and reproductive rights (Cornwall and Jolly, 2008) and erotic justice. This panel hopes to bring together researchers exploring the field of sexuality in development studies, we welcome papers that move beyond the dominant frame of exploring sexuality(ies) and bring in creative and innovative approaches, methods and ideas. The panel aims to provide a vibrant space for discussing potential and ongoing research in any stage, from idea to results. Young researchers from the Global South are especially encouraged to apply.

 
4:45pm - 5:00pmBreak
 
5:00pm - 6:00pmBook Launch Session

Book launch information:

Several books will be launched during this book launch session. Confirmed books are the following:

Annelies Zoomers, Maggi Leung, Kei Otsuki, Guus van Westen (eds) Handbook of Translocal Development and Global Mobilities (2021). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar 

Click here for more information on the book. 

Speakers: Kei Otsuki (editor, author) and Griet Steel (author)

Description: This Handbook demonstrates that global linkages, flows and circulations merit a more central place in theorization about development. Calling for a mobilities turn, it challenges the sedentarist assumptions which still underlie development policy making and planning for the future. The aim of the discussion is to  reflect on the usefulness of this translocal perspectives in our own research and the agenda to establish ‘solidarity’ in development planning and projects.

Westoby, P., Botes,L., (2020) Does Community Development Work?: Stories and practice for reconstructed community development in South Africa, Rugby, UK: Practical Action Publishing HTTP://dx.doi.org/10.3362/9781788531320 

Click here for more information on the book.

Speaker:  Lucius Botes (author) - North-West University, South Africa 

Descritpion: The book is highlighting useful practice frameworks for community development workers to answer the question of what makes community development effective. Grounded in stories of South African community development practice - dealing with issues such as housing, urban farming, land, cooperatives, education and community protests - this book combines story, conceptual insight and theoretical discourse.

 

Cheney, K., & Sinervo, A. (eds). Disadvantaged Childhoods and Humanitarian Intervention (2019).  Palgrave Macmillan.

Click here for more information on the book. 

Speaker: Aviva Sinervo

Description: This edited volume explores how transnational charitable industries are created and mobilized around childhood need in order to redirect global resource flows and sentiments to address concerns of child suffering. The chapters discuss examples from around the world to show how, as much as these processes can help achieve the goals of aid organizations, such practices can also perpetuate the conditions that organizations seek to alleviate and thereby endanger the very children they intend to help.

 
5:00pm - 6:00pmButterfly Bar 1

If you prefer to have a bilateral meeting with another conference participant, or a small group, you can meet up in the Butterfly Bar over a drink. Just go to the Bar, where ISS students will receive you in a pleasant setting. You can also come randomly and see who is around. Oh, and please don’t forget to bring your own drink!

 
5:00pm - 6:00pmCoffee Corner Session 1

After the panel sessions you may want to continue talking informally with your colleagues about the panels in your stream that have just ended. For that purpose the Coffee Corner sessions are created. Go to the Coffee corner, and choose your favourite stream from one of the break-out group topics. Of course, you can join any stream of your liking: on a panel you missed, or just to hear which questions were raised in another stream. The streams can be found in the confernece manual here

 
Date: Tuesday, 06/July/2021
8:00am - 9:00am17th Development Dialogue (ISS PhD Conference) - "Engaged Scholarship for Development: Building Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice"

17th Development Dialogue on “Engaged Scholarship for Development: Building Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice”

The Development Dialogue (DD) is an annual international PhD conference organized by the PhD candidates at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague. The objective is to exchange the results of recent and ongoing research by young scholars and doctoral candidates in different fields of development studies. Development Dialogue is a multidisciplinary, reflective and collaborative exercise which brings together researchers from around the world.

As a participant in the EADI ISS conference, you are also welcome to attend the DD sessions. Please check the programme here: 17th Development Dialogue - International Institute of Social Studies (ISS) (b2b-wizard.com) 

Important note: The DD is not organised by the same team as the EADI ISS conference. For any question relating to DD events please email dd17@iss.nl  

 
8:00am - 9:00amEast Asia/Pacific Network Session
Session Chair: Prof. Petra Dannecker, University of Vienna, Austria, Austria
Session Chair: Dr. Roy Huijsmans, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

The regional network session on East Asia/Pacific aims to strengthen regional networking by taking advantage of the online conference setting. The session welcomes researchers and representatives of institutes from this region and/or participants with a similar regional focus so that personal networks can be expanded.

EADI aims to create a community of scholars focusing on development research at the regional level. In the session, we will examine the need for creating regional networking bodies, which could for example hold (online) meetings in between general conference years. The sessions will be moderated by members of the EADI Executive Committee and co-moderated by ISS research team leaders.

 
8:00am - 9:00amTechnical Assistance Room - 8am-5pm

If you are unable to reach the technical room through the Zoom Link, please write to us at eadi2021@iss.nl. You can also reach the technical room by Telephone:

Phone: +31616801052

WhatsApp: +31616801052

 
9:00am - 9:30amBreak
 
9:30am - 10:30amCentral and South Asia Network Session
Session Chair: Dr. Isa Baud, University of Amsterdam (retired), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Arpita Bisht, International Institute of Social Studies/Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

The regional network session on Central and South Asia aims to strengthen regional networking by taking advantage of the online conference setting. The session welcomes researchers and representatives of institutes from this region and/or participants with a similar regional focus so that personal networks can be expanded.

EADI aims to create a community of scholars focusing on development research at the regional level. In the session, we will examine the need for creating regional networking bodies, which could for example hold (online) meetings in between general conference years. The sessions will be moderated by members of the EADI Executive Committee and co-moderated by ISS research team leaders.

 
10:30am - 11:00amBreak
 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-HP036 - 1/2: Reducing Modern Slavery - 1/2
Session Chair: Prof. Wendy Kay Olsen, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Prof. Jamie Anthony Morgan, Leeds Beckett, United Kingdom

The papers in this session explain different types of modern slavery, from child labour to forced and bonded labour, trafficked labour, and entrapped labour (ie coercive conditions in the employment relationship). We invite papers quantifying or documenting modern slavery; comparing child labour across countries; explaining the entrapment of labour in South Asia; exploring harmful forms of labour in Africa; and theorizing modern slavery.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-HP075 - 1/2: Production and Use of Knowledge on Governance and Development: Its Role and Contribution to Struggles for Peace, Equality and Social Justice - 1/2
Session Chair: Prof. Liisa Laakso, Nordic Africa Institute, Sweden
Session Chair: Prof. Gordon Crawford, Coventry University, United Kingdom

The panel focuses on the state of research on governance, political transitions and democratic development in the face of autocracy and populism, and how a research agenda can be made more relevant to struggles for peace, equality and social justice. What are the key research issues in contexts of rising authoritarianism? Further concerns include: the independence of scientific thought and its protection by university autonomy; and countering asymmetries in knowledge production between scholars and institutions in the Global South and North. Relevant issues include elections, democratic participation, resistance to authoritarianism, conflict transformation, struggles for human rights, anti-corruption programmes, and more.

EADI Working Group: Governance

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-HP086: Solidarity and the Next Generation: Youth and Change in Undemocratic Regimes
Session Chair: Dr. Marjoke Oosterom, Institute of Development Studies, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Lovise Aalen, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway

We expect great things from the young. From supporting democracy and human rights, to becoming great leaders. Yet many regimes use diverse strategies to co-opt the youth, repress dissent, and fragment youth movements. How can youth stand in solidarity with one another and find common ground for their futures? Which are examples of resistance successfully deployed to withstand co-option and patronage? Presenters discuss their research on youth politics, enhancing our understanding of how and under which conditions young generations can overcome divisions and contribute to promoting democracy and justice, by taking formal and/or informal political action.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-HP128: Southern Civil Society Actors and Advocacy Policies for Development
Session Chair: Willem Elbers, Radboud university, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Lau Schulpen, Radboud University, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Margit van Wessel, Wageningen University, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Jelmer Kamstra, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Thus far, advocacy research has primarily focused on international campaigns, putting large INGOs at the center of attention. In contrast, local advocacy dynamics in the global South remain poorly understood. This applies even more to advocacy undertaken by less formalized actors that are not connected to the international aid system, such as social movements or community based organizations. This panel provides a space for finished research papers that cover new ground, centering on ways to foreground the role of Southern CSOs’ advocacy in the context of development. In doing so, it aims to shift the agenda on advocacy in development research.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-RT027: Whose Renaissance? Ways of Seeing Water and Dams in Ethiopia
Session Chair: Dr. Emanuele Fantini, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

The roundtable explores the connection between popular culture and large-scale investments in water, land, and infrastructures. Inspired by different photography and visual research projects on water and development in Ethiopia, the roundtable will discuss the use of photo in building, legitimising or challenging narratives about development, nature and technology. Photographers and researchers from Ethiopia, Egypt, UK and Italy will engage in a post-colonial discussion on representation, ethics of photojournalism, aesthetics and power. They will share and compare their gazes to reflect on how different artistic canons might be used to elicit emotions about water, to represent different stories and to give voices to specific interests.

Confirmed speakers:

Martha Taddesse - freelance humanitarian photographer, Ethiopia

Roger Anis - photojournalist, Egypt

Fausto Podavini - photojournalist, Italy

Alice Chautard - REACH Communications and Knowledge Exchange Manager, University of Oxford, UK

Moderator:

Emanuele Fantini - IHE Delft Institute for Water Education

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-RT044: Safety and Security for University Staff, Students and Research Participants
Session Chair: Prof. Thea Hilhorst, ISS/EUR, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Linda Johnson, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Rodrigo Mena, Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

Safety and security is a neglected aspect of field work. It is important for researchers, collaborators and research participants. Safety and security often reflects hierarchies in development studies, whereby well-insured international researchers work with partners who have no such facilities. University managers often approach security with the objective of protecting the university from liability. This may lead to further inequality when international researchers are denied access to the field. It is time for the academic community to take the initiative. The session provides a space for sharing good practice around an agenda that is rooted in a need for solidarity, so as to address unintended but growing inequality in how we conduct our research in the field.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr. Eric Beerkens - Head of WOTRO, Science for Global Development (Netherlands)

Dr. Vagisha Gunasekara

Dr. Rod Mena

Thea Hilhorst will start the session with an introduction to the topic. In addition, Professor Dr. Henning Melber will offer reflections on the topic

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-RT115: Author Meets Critics: "Business, Power and Sustainability in a World of Global Value Chains"
Session Chair: Prof. Stefano Ponte, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

This roundtable will critically discuss the findings of a new book by Stefano Ponte, ‘Business, Power and Sustainability in a World of Global Value Chains’ and their implications for sustainable development futures. Based in over 15 years of research, the book examines how sustainability governance can be best designed, managed and institutionalized in today’s world of global value chains (GVCs), with particular emphasis on actors and processes based in the Global South. The panel will discuss the social and environmental justice implications of sustainability as applied by business in practice – and the role of solidarity in promoting ‘just sustainabilities’.

Confirmed Speakers:

Philip Mader - Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, UK

Luís Bernardo - University of Lisbon, Portugal

Aarti Krishnan - University of Manchester, UK

Khalid Nadvi - Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, UK

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-SP081: Sustainable Business Models for Peace, Social Justice and Solidarity
Session Chair: Dr. Luis Mah, CESA-ISEG-Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal
Session Chair: Dr. Farwa Sial, University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Business-led economic growth is at the core of the 2030 global development agenda seen as the primary driver of investments, jobs creation and production of goods and services.Business actors are increasingly being called to play an innovative and more central role to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This panel aims to explore if partnerships with business through sustainable governance initiatives can address issues of solidarity, peace and social justice in context to global value chains.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-SP098: Views on the EU as a Development Actor in Conversation with Postdevelopment
Session Chair: Nathan Vandeputte, Universiteit Gent, Belgium
Session Chair: Prof. Sarah Delputte, Ghent University, Belgium
Session Chair: Dr. Julia Schöneberg, University of Kassel, Germany

In contrast to Western development models centred on needs and economic development, postdevelopment questions the need for development as such, in favour of more radical alternatives endorsing global solidarity and social justice. Hence, departing from the argument that bridging EU development policy analysis with postdevelopment starts from a dialogue that must be based on tracing and unmaking colonial continuations, in this seed panel we harness the opportunity to scrutinize how such concrete ‘alternatives (to) EU development policy’ might look and how we – as (Western) academic scholars – can (or can’t) incorporate these into our own framework of development policy analysis.

EADI Working Groups: the European Union as a Development Actor and Post- and Decolonial Perspectives on Development

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-WS042: Practising Feminist Political Ecology: Building Knowledge Communities
Session Chair: Prof. Wendy Harcourt, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Lyla Mehta, Institute of Development studies, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Prof. Margreet Zwarteveen, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Irene Leonardelli, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, Netherlands, The

Feminist Political Ecology (FPE) is an approach that looks at how to promote community well-being and socio-environmental justice, analysing power relations within different systems of oppression at different scales. FPE examines the processes, strategies and political mechanisms that different individuals and communities in the global North and in the global South use to challenge the existing power relations based on exploitation, domination, and conflict. The workshop will share experiences and insights of the Wellbeing Ecology Gender Communities (WEGO) ITN network on how to do grounded FPE research in collaboration and solidarity with social movements and community initiatives around issues of social and environmental justice, natural resource management and care. Mentors and PhDs will engage in a conversation together with the workshop’s participants, to share their experiences about practicing research-activism in different contexts, using creative and reflective research methods and sharing outputs in different visual ways.

No abstract submission possible for Workshop Sessions.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm2-WS055: From theory to practice: Improving transnational and transdisciplinary cooperation through reflecting on implicit values and power structures
Session Chair: Dr. Johanna Vogel, German Development Institute, Germany, Germany
Session Chair: Dr. Anna Schwachula, German Development Institute, Germany, Germany
Session Chair: Dr. Tatjana Reiber, German Development Institute, Germany, Germany

Context


In order to promote the goals of the 2030 Agenda, achieve global solidarity and social justice, a transformation of societies in the global North as well as the global South towards these objectives is crucial. Transnational and transdisciplinary networks are key actors for the creation of the kind of transformative knowledge needed. However, working in transnational, transdisciplinary networks may be challenging. Tensions and conflicts may arise which can limit their potential impact. We therefore seek to examine how transnational, transdisciplinary knowledge networks can overcome inherent challenges by discussing the role of power imbalances between participants as well as different normative assumptions of diverse participants.


We propose that discussing power imbalances as well as the underlying values that may cause tensions and conflicts within cooperation is a first step to reach equitable cooperation. Making implicit values and imbalances visible is a precondition for developing collective values and a common vision. In our workshop, we provide a space for mutual learning and exchange of experiences. We aim to a) explore manifestations of structural power imbalances in our research partnerships and develop ideas how to reduce them and b) create awareness for the role that values play in research partnerships.


Workshop Design: World-café


Following an input by Dr Ananya Chakraborty (ICRISAT), the workshop will be organized as a world café.
1) Which types of power imbalances exist within your partnerships? Are they discussed openly? How do you aim to overcome them? Which (structural) dilemmas are you experiencing in the process?
2) Which roles do values play in your partnerships? How are individual values made transparent? How do you deal with contradictory values? How do you negotiate and implement joint values?

According to the world café method, the group will be divided into two break out groups to discuss and exchange experiences on power distribution and values in their partnerships. All findings will be recorded on virtual flipcharts and will be presented to the whole group afterwards.


Addressees of the workshop:


Researchers and other stakeholders working in cooperative (research) projects, at all levels of experience, wishing to reflect about cooperation as well as their own role and values.

 
12:15pm - 12:30pmBreak
 
12:30pm - 1:30pmAfrica Network Sessions
Session Chair: Prof. Katja Bender, Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, Germany
Session Chair: Dr. Carl Jonas Ewald, Linneaus University, Sweden
Session Chair: Prof. Peter Knorringa, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The

The regional network session on Africa aims to strengthen regional networking by taking advantage of the online conference setting. The session welcomes researchers and representatives of institutes from this region and/or participants with a similar regional focus so that personal networks can be expanded.

EADI aims to create a community of scholars focusing on development research at the regional level. In the session, we will examine the need for creating regional networking bodies, which could for example hold (online) meetings in between general conference years. The sessions will be moderated by members of the EADI Executive Committee and co-moderated by ISS research team leaders.

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmDigital Campaign: Solidarity for Myanmar through Art

The Raise Three Fingers (RTF) campaign began as a response to the coup and the military’s suppression of creative thought and expression. Artists across the globe have offered their interpretations of the now-famous three-finger salute, first seen in the book and film The Hunger Games, and since taken up by activists in countries across Southeast Asia as a show of solidarity against authoritarian governments that are failing to provide their populations with basic rights and protections.

Currently over 1500 artists across 45 countries have shown their support by submitting a three finger salute and the number increases every day.  Besides the online campaign, exhibitions, events and media collaborations are currently being organized across the world to amplify awareness about what’s happening in Myanmar and support the global fight for freedom, democracy and human rights. The solidarity expressed by people around the world through beautiful art pieces is a way to bring hope to the people of Myanmar and make them feel supported and listened to.

Join in & learn more about the use of art in collective action. And how a theme such as solidarity can influence positive narratives, spread messages of hope and continue to highlight the unfolding human rights and humanitarian crises happening in Myanmar. We will also share ways of how you can support or become involved in the campaign.  

Digital campaign Raise Three Fingers: https://www.threefingers.org/landing

 
12:30pm - 1:30pmMeet and Greet - ISS Alumni (1/2)

ISS has an extensive alumni network of over 13,000 former students in more than 150 countries. A strong global network of development professionals. By engaging closely with alumni, ISS strengthens its position within the global society, facilitates contact opportunities between students, staff, and alumni, and receives support and input from active alumni, whether regarding advice, research cooperation, capacity development or promoting the ISS brand. Moreover, ISS provides post-graduation services such as refresher courses. The ISS PhD Alumni Association (IPAA) builds its community through discussion platforms, conferences, news sharing, blogs, newsletters and on/-offline events to connect, exchange and collaborate, and to revive memories and relationships with each other, supervisors, etc. The group of over 220 PhD alumni stands out as these alumni have often engaged for longer periods with the institute. As such they have a strong link with the ISS and its research.

 
1:30pm - 2:00pmBreak
 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP001: Multidimensional Impacts of COVID-19 on Poverty and Wellbeing
Session Chair: Dr. Keetie Roelen, Institute of Development Studies, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Suman Seth, University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Following roughly 18 months after the start of the unprecedented global pandemic of COVID-19, this harvest panel session will consider the multidimensional impacts of the pandemic on aspects of poverty and wellbeing, and the effectiveness of policies that have tried to mitigate socioeconomic consequences. Convened by the ‘Multi-Dimensional Poverty and Poverty Dynamics’ Working Group, we consider the degrees to which interventions have been informed by multidimensional understandings of poverty and wellbeing. While the pandemic is seen to mainly detrimental for the poor, consideration is given to the ways in which it also presents an opportunity to build back better. Are there signs of positive interventions where those living in poverty will emerge with their lives and wellbeing enhanced; more resilient, valued and embraced?

This panel is organised by the EADI Working Group ‘Multi-Dimensional Poverty and Poverty Dynamics

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP036 - 2/2: Reducing Modern Slavery - 2/2
Session Chair: Prof. Wendy Kay Olsen, University of Manchester, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Prof. Jamie Anthony Morgan, Leeds Beckett, United Kingdom

The papers in this session explain different types of modern slavery, from child labour to forced and bonded labour, trafficked labour, and entrapped labour (ie coercive conditions in the employment relationship). We invite papers quantifying or documenting modern slavery; comparing child labour across countries; explaining the entrapment of labour in South Asia; exploring harmful forms of labour in Africa; and theorizing modern slavery.

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP050 - 1/2: Building Solidarity for Empowerment and Accountability in Difficult Settings - 1/2
Session Chair: Prof. John Gaventa, IDS, United Kingdom

Much of the literature on collective action has emerged from settings which are somewhat democratic and open. On the other hand, an estimated two billion people currently live in countries where these conditions do not exist and their ability to act is affected by war, high social distrust, political instability and weak or repressive governments on a daily basis. What are the collective action strategies used in such settings? How do they contribute to solidarity and overcoming marginalisation, and greater empowerment and democratic accountability? What can we learn from these settings for our more general understandings of collective action, solidarity and social justice?

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP075 - 2/2: Production and Use of Knowledge on Governance and Development: Its Role and Contribution to Struggles for Peace, Equality and Social Justice - 2/2
Session Chair: Prof. Liisa Laakso, Nordic Africa Institute, Sweden
Session Chair: Prof. Gordon Crawford, Coventry University, United Kingdom

The panel focuses on the state of research on governance, political transitions and democratic development in the face of autocracy and populism, and how a research agenda can be made more relevant to struggles for peace, equality and social justice. What are the key research issues in contexts of rising authoritarianism? Further concerns include: the independence of scientific thought and its protection by university autonomy; and countering asymmetries in knowledge production between scholars and institutions in the Global South and North. Relevant issues include elections, democratic participation, resistance to authoritarianism, conflict transformation, struggles for human rights, anti-corruption programmes, and more.

EADI Working Group: Governance

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP085 - 1/2: Social Policy as Social Ordering in Development: Critical Perspectives - 1/2
Session Chair: Dr. María Gabriela Palacio Ludeña, Leiden University, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Hayley Amanda Jones, University College London, UK, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Maria Klara Kuss, UNU-MERIT/Maastricht University, Puerto Rico (U.S.)
Session Chair: Dr. Andrew Martin Fischer, Institute of Social Studies (The Hague), Netherlands, The

This panel invites contributions that explore the norms, institutional processes, social relations, and power dynamics associated with various aspects of social policy in developing countries, and the role they might play as instruments of social ordering. Of particular interest is the possibility that many policies and programmes might play a role in perpetuating processes of social inequality rather than promoting solidarity; their instrumentalisation through narrow targeting modalities; their role in governing social and political identities; and the possibility that many might maintain rather than attenuate existing power dynamics, thereby reproducing forms of discrimination, oppression, and segregation detrimental to solidarity. These possibilities are crucial to explore, given the often uncritical acceptance and promotion of social policy as a means to achieve social justice and build social solidarities in development.

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP100 - 1/2: Education and Social Justice in the Pluriverse - 1/2
Session Chair: Dr. Paola Minoia, University of Helsinki, Finland
Session Chair: Dr. Johanna Maaria Hohenthal, University of Helsinki, Finland
Session Chair: Dr. Tuija Marita Veintie, University of Helsinki, Finland

The SDG4 aims to promote social justice through engagement on “quality education for all”. However, it does not consider epistemic diversity of the world and the right to alternative ways of learning and knowledge production. Neither does it contain any reference to the UN declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples. Thus, Indigenous perspectives, knowledges and alternative forms of education remain marginalized in state-led and other development programs that typically reproduce models of neoliberal multiculturalism and fail to promote equal relations among existing cultures. This session welcomes papers that discuss pluriversal educational alternatives and critical intercultural education in diverse contexts.

EADI Working Group: Post- and Decolonial Perspectives on Development

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP108: Partnerships or Development in EU External Relations?
Session Chair: Prof. Simon Lightfoot, University of Leeds, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Prof. Sarah Delputte, Ghent University, Belgium
Session Chair: Prof. Jörg Faust, DEval, Germany
Session Chair: Prof. Nadia Molenaers, Univeristy of Antwerpn, Belgium

This harvest panel focuses on the recent use of the term partnerships in the context of development cooperation policy in the EU. Rhetorically at least this potentially signals a greater commitment to solidarity and social justice on the part of the EU. We invite papers that explore the context of the EU foreign and development policy changing from normative exceptionalism to a more interest-driven approach. The increasingly challenging environment for EU member states and institutions to find common ground in this policy sphere, the negotiations of a new partnership with the ACP countries and the Commission’s proposal for a major overhaul of the EU’s financial architecture for external action all point to the EU being at a crossroads.

EADI Working Groups: the European Union as a Development Actor and Development Cooperation Policies and Performance

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP112: Transformative Methodologies for Social Justice
Session Chair: Dr. Karin Astrid Siegmann, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Sanchita Bakshi, Erasmus University Roterdam, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Brenda Rodríguez, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Chitrakshi Vashisht, International Institute of Social Studies the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Development studies has been characterised by a strong and explicit commitment to social justice. This ethical commitment contrasts, however, with the criticism that the way in which development research is often conducted, in fact, reinforces injustices. This motivates a quest for methodologies that are organised in ways that embody progressive social change in the research process already. For this panel, we therefore invite empirical and conceptual contributions rooted in diverse geographies and epistemologies which engage with the question of how to put transformation centre-stage in approaches to development research.

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP116: Economic, Social and Environmental Upgrading in Global Value Chains
Session Chair: Prof. Stefano Ponte, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
Session Chair: Dr. Aarti Krishnan, University of Manchester, UK, United Kingdom

Global Value Chains (GVC) have become key for understanding how the global fragmentation of production affects sustainable development and social justice. Under what circumstances participation in GVCs allows firms and territories to gain market access and learning opportunities? What forms of participation can foster solidarity among disadvantaged players and along value chains? How can economic, social and environmental upgrading promote social and environmental justice and address inequalities along value chains? By bringing together academics across disciplines, and from both the Global South and Global North, the panel aims to explore whether and how GVCs can be vectors of sustainable development.

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-HP140: The Extractive Imperative, a Global Phenomenon?
Session Chair: Dr. Lorenzo Pellegrini, ISS Erasmus University, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Murat Arsel, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Natural resource extraction is seen simultaneously as a source of income, employment generation and financing for social policy expenditure and investment in infrastructure. More broadly, extractive industries are considered conducive to development, to the point that governments and other social actors embrace an ‘extractive imperative’. According to this imperative, extraction needs to continue and expand regardless of prevailing circumstances, ultimately undermining social justice. The concept has originated from Latin America, but has subsequently been applied to countries outside the region. This panel aims at the shape the extractive imperative has taken in Latin America after the conclusion of the ‘left turn’ as well as discussing it globally and comparatively. We invite the submission of (early) drafts and extended abstracts for the panel.

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-RT017: Building Solidarity with Young Social Justice Activists
Session Chair: Dr. Kristen Cheney, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The

Led by young activists, with activist scholars and practitioners, we will examine the innovative social justice strategies of young activists and human rights defenders advocating for social change. While there is ample attention on what does not work, this interactive roundtable will make constructive contributions by analysing how young people’s social innovations are creating positive change across the world. Together, we will also consider how development scholars and practitioners can most effectively promote solidarity with today’s youthful peace and justice movements.

Confirmed speakers:

Ms. Dola Akter (16) - Child Forum member and activist campaigning to stop violence against children and gender discrimination, Bangladesh (co-moderator)

Dr. Kristen Cheney - Associate Professor of Children & Youth Studies, ISS, Netherlands (organizer and co-moderator)

Dr. Patricio Cuevas-Parra - Director, Child Participation and Rights, World Vision International, Cyprus

Lucy Jamieson - Senior Researcher, The Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Dr. Laura Wright - Director, Participatory Methodologies, International Institute for Child Rights and Development, Canada; Research Fellow, University of Edinburgh 

Prathit Singh - 18, youth activist with COVIDUnder19 project, Student at University of Delhi, India

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-RT134: Water, Food and Social Justice
Session Chair: Prof. Lyla Mehta, Institute of Development studies, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Deepa Joshi, International Water Management Institute, Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka

This roundtable seeks to advance a social and gender justice perspective on water, food and the environment. It will

(1) Critically examine mainstream discourses in the water, food and environmental realms, and highlight some key limitations around inclusion and equity;

(2) Dismantle sectoral boundaries between water, food, nature and wellbeing;

(3) Explore how the human rights to water and food can be joined up in a meaningful way to promote a gender just human rights approach to water and food security

(5) Advance bottom-up alternatives calling for transformative change beyond technical solutions to address complex socio-political and environmental exclusions.

Confirmed speakers:

Professor Lyla Mehta - Institute of Development Studies, UK

Dr Shilpi Srivastava - Institute of Development Studies, UK

Dr Deepa Joshi - International Water Management Institute, Colombo

Dr K J Joy Joy - SOPPECOM, India KJ

 
2:00pm - 3:15pm3-SP002 - 1/2: Emotionally Engaged: Reflecting Upon Researchers’ Positionality - 1/2
Session Chair: Prof. An Ansoms, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Research interacts with and has an impact upon the field in which it is grounded. The literature engages with discussing ethical and epistemological dimensions of research. It also increasingly invites researchers to reflect upon their own positionality. However, social scientists are badly trained when it comes to talk about the emotionality that their research generates. When doing research on topics such as solidarity, peace and social justice (or the lack thereof), these emotional challenges may be all the more profound. We invite papers that reflect upon researchers’ positionality in relation to their research life, and the emotionality embedded within their trajectory. Contributions in the form of draft papers will reflect upon the ways in which researchers’ own emotionality interacts with their engagement as a scientist and – potentially – as an activist.

 
2:00pm - 3:15pmMeet the Publisher - Palgrave Journals

With Jessica Banning (senior editor at Palgrave)

The session will introduce participants to the European Journal of Development Research (EJDR), its features, submission process and the Early career initiative. Jessica Banning, senior editor of Palgrave will be available for all questions concerning Palgrave's portfolio of journals, open access, ethical standards and submission and peer review process.

 
3:15pm - 3:30pmBreak
 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-HP050 - 2/2: Building Solidarity for Empowerment and Accountability in Difficult Settings - 2/2
Session Chair: Colin Anderson, Institute of Development Studies, United Kingdom

Much of the literature on collective action has emerged from settings which are somewhat democratic and open. On the other hand, an estimated two billion people currently live in countries where these conditions do not exist and their ability to act is affected by war, high social distrust, political instability and weak or repressive governments on a daily basis. What are the collective action strategies used in such settings? How do they contribute to solidarity and overcoming marginalisation, and greater empowerment and democratic accountability? What can we learn from these settings for our more general understandings of collective action, solidarity and social justice?

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-HP085 - 2/2: Social Policy as Social Ordering in Development: Critical Perspectives - 2/2
Session Chair: Dr. María Gabriela Palacio Ludeña, Leiden University, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Hayley Amanda Jones, University College London, UK, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Maria Klara Kuss, UNU-MERIT/Maastricht University, Puerto Rico (U.S.)
Session Chair: Dr. Andrew Martin Fischer, Institute of Social Studies (The Hague), Netherlands, The

This panel invites contributions that explore the norms, institutional processes, social relations, and power dynamics associated with various aspects of social policy in developing countries, and the role they might play as instruments of social ordering. Of particular interest is the possibility that many policies and programmes might play a role in perpetuating processes of social inequality rather than promoting solidarity; their instrumentalisation through narrow targeting modalities; their role in governing social and political identities; and the possibility that many might maintain rather than attenuate existing power dynamics, thereby reproducing forms of discrimination, oppression, and segregation detrimental to solidarity. These possibilities are crucial to explore, given the often uncritical acceptance and promotion of social policy as a means to achieve social justice and build social solidarities in development.

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-HP097: Can Inclusive Business Deliver for the Poor?
Session Chair: Dr. Nicky Pouw, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The

The purpose of this session is to further the critical debate on the role of inclusive business; can it deliver for the poor? In theory, inclusive business fosters solidarity in production and consumption value chains, and enables the BoP to overcome structural exclusion from resources, markets and institutions. Critics note there is a tension between promise and reality: there are risks that inclusive business models exclude BoP perspectives and lived experiences, overlook structural constraints and exclusionary mechanisms faced by the BoP , and fail to translate into responsive policy and action. Based on grounded research, we shall pull together new insights on inclusive business, to determine how it can deliver social and economic justice by and for the poor.

EADI Working Group: Inclusive Development

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-HP100 - 2/2: Education and Social Justice in the Pluriverse - 2/2
Session Chair: Dr. Paola Minoia, University of Helsinki, Finland
Session Chair: Dr. Johanna Maaria Hohenthal, University of Helsinki, Finland
Session Chair: Dr. Tuija Marita Veintie, University of Helsinki, Finland

The SDG4 aims to promote social justice through engagement on “quality education for all”. However, it does not consider epistemic diversity of the world and the right to alternative ways of learning and knowledge production. Neither does it contain any reference to the UN declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples. Thus, Indigenous perspectives, knowledges and alternative forms of education remain marginalized in state-led and other development programs that typically reproduce models of neoliberal multiculturalism and fail to promote equal relations among existing cultures. This session welcomes papers that discuss pluriversal educational alternatives and critical intercultural education in diverse contexts.

EADI Working Group: Post- and Decolonial Perspectives on Development

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-RT001: Interrogating the Relational Ontological Turn in Development Studies
Session Chair: Dr. Andrew Newsham, SOAS, University of London, United Kingdom

Relational ontological approaches, in the ascendancy more broadly in the social sciences, have been finding their way into development studies, notably in the work of scholars like Arturo Escobar (i.e. 2010), and Kelsey Hanrahan, in her deeply moving relational ontology of care (2015). However, relational ontologies are often set up as a repudiation of, as having ‘gone beyond’, modernist and post-modernist accounts of being and knowing, offering critique of the philosophical underpinnings of, for instance, ‘structural’ accounts of poverty and inequality (i.e. Hickey & du Toit 2007, Mosse 2010, Taylor 2014), which themselves have made strong contributions to the resurgence of a focus on solidarity, peace and justice. Have such approaches really ‘had their day', metaphysically speaking? Moreover, some commentators have argued that more prominent relational ontological accounts share an elective affinity with the depoliticising tendencies of neoliberalism (i.e. Lave 2015, Swyngedouw & Ernstson 2018). Given the prominence of debates around depoliticisation in development studies since the 1990s (i.e. Ferguson, 1994), it is important to explore the extent to which the ‘relational ontological turn’ serves as a reliable vehicle for advancing development grounded in solidarity, peace and justice; all of which are, fundamentally, political objectives.

This roundtable proposes to present to a wider audience the results of a small two-day workshop, taking place shortly before EADI. The workshop seeks to bring into dialogue advocates and skeptics of relational ontologies. Rather than adjudicate between rival positions, the aim is to make space for diverse accounts to articulate (onto-) theoretical resources through a process that admits of both greater agreement through mutual learning and articulating clear dissensus as departure points for clarifying standpoints and political commitments (de la Cadena 2018). These reflections will be offered with a view to stimulating further debate and discussion with those interested in attending the session.

Chair: Suraya Scheba, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Confirmed Speakers:

Oliver Belcher, University of Durham, UK

Henrik Ernstson, University of Manchester, UK

Andrew Newsham, SOAS, University of London, UK

Jesse Ribot, American University, USA

Erik Swyngedouw, University of Manchester, UK

Marcus Taylor, Queens University, Canada

Arianna Tozzi, University of Manchester, UK

Click here for references

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-RT051: Inclusive Development and Social Justice: Challenges and Opportunities in Water Governance
Session Chair: Prof. Joyeeta Gupta, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Klaas Schwartz, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

This session examines how particular models, concepts and instruments in the water sector have different meanings depending on the domain in which they are being discussed and practiced and how this impacts on inclusive development and social justice. These domains of water governance may concern international and national policy and legal domains or operational domains of water provision. The interpretation and meaning of these concepts may differ between domains. This session aims to:

  • Unravel the different interpretations of inclusive development and social justice;
  • Understand the different models, concepts and instruments used by different actors and their interpretations of how these contribute to inclusive development and social justice; and
  • Examine the challenges and opportunities in promoting inclusive development and social justice in the water sector.

The Round Table will have the following structure:

Presentation on inclusive development and social justice in water, Joyeeta Gupta and Klaas Schwartz, 10 minutes

Collaboration on challenges and opportunities on an open online work space

Discussion led by Klaas Schwartz

Conclusions and follow-up led by Joyeeta Gupta

Confirmed speakers:

Lyla Mehta - University of Sussex

Tatiana Acevedo - Utrecht University

Emanuele Fantini - IHE Delft Institute for Water Education

Hebe Verrest - University of Amsterdam

Gabriela Cuadrado - IHE Delft Institute for Water Education

Michaela Hordijk - University of Amsterdam

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-RT066: Policy Perspectives on Frugal Innovation
Session Chair: Prof. Peter Knorringa, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The

This roundtable session examines various policy perspectives on frugal innovation, bringing together panelists from different stakeholder groups. Now that frugal innovation is starting to become recognized by donor agencies, NGOs and social entrepreneurs as a potentially useful vehicle to stimulate progressive change, social justice and local development, this panel will offer a first opportunity for various stakeholder representatives to share their emerging views on the intervention logics around frugal innovation. It will consist of an open discussion among the panelists and the audience, facilitated by Greetje Schouten and Peter Knorringa.

EADI Working Group: Frugal Innovation and Development

Confirmed speakers:

Dr.Ing. Wolfgang Wittke - Advisor to the Eureka Head of Secretariat (Eureka)

Bart Jeroen Bierens - Project coordinator for Circular Manufacturing Programme (UPCM), Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO)

Wijnand van Smaalen - Senior strategist Economy, Province of Zuid-Holland

Dr. Saskia Vossenberg -  Lead Gender - Migration and Remittances, United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF)

 

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-RT074: Can Global Norms of Gender Equality Create Social Justice?
Session Chair: Dr. Lars Engberg-Pedersen, Danish Institute for International Studies, Denmark
Session Chair: Adam Fejerskov, Danish Institute for International Studies, Denmark, Denmark

One of the most profound and omnipresent inequalities relate to gender. The struggle for gender equality has a long history, and significant efforts to establish globally accepted norms on gender equality seek to pressure states to address marginalisation and create social justice. But how do global norms emerge, which actors are influential, what broader contexts frame the norms, and how do global and local processes of norm engagement interact. The roundtable explores these questions on the basis of Rethinking gender equality in global governance: The delusion of norm diffusion, Palgrave, 2020.

The role of global norms has been approached in different ways. Some have argued that once adopted and supported by a significant number of countries, they tend to diffuse to all corners of the world. Others state that global norms are constantly being reinterpreted and translated given the particular context in which actors address them, and yet others suggest that identity politics is so important in most countries that global norms are only addressed if they support existing identity narratives. Given the strong international focus on establishing global norms, e.g. through the Sustainable Development Goals, it is central to explore how and to what extent they may establish solidarity, peace and social justice.

Between 1975 and 1995 several significant UN world conferences addressed gender equality and how to achieve it. Its normative contents changed significantly during those twenty years and have continued to change subsequently. Accordingly, it is difficult to identify a clear set of global norms on gender equality which may have to do with the many different actors involved and the changing contexts of international negotiations. Given the extensive gender inequalities existing all over the world, one may also wonder whether global norms on gender equality are unimportant or even counterproductive and seen as imperialistic outside intervention.

The roundtable addresses the following questions:

  • How can current global norms on gender equality be described and to what extent does the SDG5 do a fair job of summarizing them?
  • How should the process of norm development be analysed and which actors are central in that process?
  • Which factors influence norm engagement in specific organizational and social contexts?
  • To what extent do global norms on gender equality strengthen local initiatives to combat gender-based inequalities and create social justice?

Organisation

After a short introduction by the convenor (5 minutes), each question is discussed for 20 minutes based on a short presentation by one of the speakers.

Confirmed speakers

Susanne Zwingel - Florida International University 

Anna van der Vleuten - Radboud University 

Jutta Joachim - Radboud University 

Lata Narayanaswamy - Leeds University 

Sabine Lang - University of Washington 

Ben Jones - University of East Anglia 

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-SP002 - 2/2: Emotionally Engaged: Reflecting Upon Researchers’ Positionality - 2/2
Session Chair: Prof. An Ansoms, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Research interacts with and has an impact upon the field in which it is grounded. The literature engages with discussing ethical and epistemological dimensions of research. It also increasingly invites researchers to reflect upon their own positionality. However, social scientists are badly trained when it comes to talk about the emotionality that their research generates. When doing research on topics such as solidarity, peace and social justice (or the lack thereof), these emotional challenges may be all the more profound. We invite papers that reflect upon researchers’ positionality in relation to their research life, and the emotionality embedded within their trajectory. Contributions in the form of draft papers will reflect upon the ways in which researchers’ own emotionality interacts with their engagement as a scientist and – potentially – as an activist.

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-SP021: How to Conceptualize and Map the INVISIBLE to Inform Solidarity, Peace and Justice Aspirations?
Session Chair: Dr. Diana Reckien, University of Twente, the Netherlands, Germany
Session Chair: Dr. Javier Martinez, University of Twente, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Sandeep Balagangadharan Menon, KRVIA Mumbai, India
Session Chair: Prof. Karin Pfeffer, University of Twente, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Christine Richter, Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy IMW, Germany, Germany

Invisibility is associated with social inequality and lack of justice and solidarity. In order to inform solidarity, peace and justice aspirations, scholars map invisible people, groups of people, and underlying societal processes. However, invisibility is dynamic and changes depending on environmental, political and/or socio-economic development. This panel invites contributions that critically reflect on traditional forms of mapping invisibility and suggest alternative forms of spatially assessing invisibility and underlying gradients of inequality, poverty and political marginalization. What/ who needs to be made visible in a world of climate change, political fragmentation, and growing distrust to inform solidarity, peace and justice aspirations?

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-SP089: Migrant Struggles for Social Justice
Session Chair: Prof. Maria del Carmen Villarreal Villamar, Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Brazil
Session Chair: Dr. Enara Echart Muñoz, Unirio, Brazil
Session Chair: Marta Carballo de la Riva, UCM, Switzerland

Social justice as the backbone of peace and an essential component of sustainable human development, places migration as key element in the construction of contemporary society. We want to analyze experiences that rescue the agency and autonomy of the migrant population and that consider their struggles, forms of mobilization, solidarity and their contributions in the creation of more inclusive and equitable societies. In that way, this workshop is open to proposals from academics, social organizations and grassroot movements that present or analyze these struggles in all their diversity around the world.

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-SP132: Developing Countries and the Future of the Multilateral Order
Session Chair: Prof. Wil Hout, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

The panel focuses on the contemporary pressure on the multilateral (“liberal”) international order and the consequences for developing countries. The objective of the workshop is to bring together a group of development studies experts who reflect on the impact of changes in the multilateral order for developing countries. The aim is to attract draft papers that are comparative in nature, and focus on comparisons of developing countries in particular regions (for instance, Africa versus Asia or Latin America) or relate to specific categories of developing countries (such as least developed countries, landlocked or small-island developing countries).

 
3:30pm - 4:45pm4-WS018: Children as Experts: The Healthy Relationships Model for Youth-Led Research and Advocacy
Session Chair: Dr. Kristen Cheney, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The

In this session we share our experiences from a youth participatory research and advocacy project, Adolescents’ Perceptions of Healthy Relationships, which departed from the premise that young people are the experts of their own lives, and that children and adolescents should be given the opportunity to co-create knowledge. In the process, we also developed a Healthy Relationships Model for working effectively with young people in research and development practice. In the workshop, we will teach others how to use the tools and methods to transform young people into successful young researchers and advocacy campaigners.

No abstract submission possible for Workshop Sessions.

Adult project participants: 

Kristen Cheney - APHR project leader, ISS

Annah Kamusiime - TZ lead researcher, ISS

Kristina Nenova - BG lead researcher, Animus Foundation, Bulgaria

Lydia Sandi - TZ project coordinator, CEREDEV, Tanzania

Naishoki Paul - TZ supervisor Dar es Salaam

Peer researchers and advocates Bulgaria: 

Alexander Ivanov 

Viktoria Nikolova 

Iva Naydenova 

Zornica Todotova 

Elica Yovkova  

Peer researchers and advocates Tanzania: 

Catherine Kato  

Masasi Stephano 

Emmanuella Emmanuel  

 

 
4:45pm - 5:00pmBreak
 
5:00pm - 6:00pmButterfly Bar 2

If you prefer to have a bilateral meeting with another conference participant, or a small group, you can meet up in the Butterfly Bar over a drink. Just go to the Bar, where ISS students will receive you in a pleasant setting. You can also come randomly and see who is around. Oh, and please don’t forget to bring your own drink!

 
5:00pm - 6:00pmCoffee Corner Session 2

After the panel sessions you may want to continue talking informally with your colleagues about the panels in your stream that have just ended. For that purpose the Coffee Corner sessions are created. Go to the Coffee corner, and choose your favourite stream from one of the break-out group topics. Of course, you can join any stream of your liking: on a panel you missed, or just to hear which questions were raised in another stream. The streams can be found in the confernece manual here

 
6:00pm - 6:30pmBreak
 
6:30pm - 7:30pmLatin America Network Sessions
Session Chair: Dr. Antonio Sianes, Universidad Loyola Andalucia, Spain
Session Chair: Dr. Kees Biekart, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Pedro Goulart, CAPP, Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal

The regional network session on Latin America aims to strengthen regional networking by taking advantage of the online conference setting. The session welcomes researchers and representatives of institutes from this region and/or participants with a similar regional focus so that personal networks can be expanded.

EADI aims to create a community of scholars focusing on development research at the regional level. In the session, we will examine the need for creating regional networking bodies, which could for example hold (online) meetings in between general conference years. The sessions will be moderated by members of the EADI Executive Committee and co-moderated by ISS research team leaders.

 
Date: Wednesday, 07/July/2021
 Technical Assistance Room

If you are unable to reach the technical room through the Zoom Link, please write to us at eadi2021@iss.nl. You can also reach the technical room by Telephone:

Phone: +31616801052

WhatsApp: +31616801052

 
9:00am - 10:15amPlenary: Questioning Development – Towards Solidarity, Decoloniality, Conviviality

Chair: Uma Kothari – Professor of Migration and Postcolonial Studies, Global Development Institute, Manchester University (United Kingdom)

Panellists:

Yvonne Underhill-Sem – Associate Professor, Pacific Studies, Te Wānanga o Waipapa, School of Maori Studies and Pacific Studies in the Faculty of Arts, University of Auckland (New-Zealand)

Aram Ziai - Heisenberg Chair for Development and Postcolonial Studies at the Institute of Political Science, University of Kassel (Germany)

Lauren Tynan – Department of Indigenous Studies & Macquarie School of Social Sciences, Macquarie University (Australia)

Samid Suliman - School of Humanities, Languages and Social Science, Griffith University (Australia)

The starting point for this roundtable discussion is a growing demand to decolonise knowledge. We are positioned at a critical moment, one replete with a potential to shape the future of development (and development studies). The panel participants will discuss their perspectives and approaches to decolonising development (studies), focusing specifically on how new forms of solidarity and conviviality can be promoted and sustained to achieve global social justice.

The roundtable is scheduled to take place in the early morning (European time) in order to ensure the inclusion of EADI’s constituency in the Asia-Pacific region.

More information about the speakers here: Second Plenary, 7 July, 9-10.15 am | EADI 

 
10:15am - 11:00amBreak
 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-HP008: Social Accountability – A Promising Route to Social Justice?
Session Chair: Dr. Sylvia Bergh, International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam AND The Hague University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Elsbet Lodenstein, Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), Netherlands, The

Social accountability, referring to citizen-led demands for the respect of civic, political and social rights and improved performance of public service delivery, is gaining attention. This panel aims to present and discuss ways in which such initiatives can contribute to social justice: equitable participation, respectful of diversity and supportive to the transformation of power relations.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-HP039 - 1/2: Between Financial Dependence and Policy Autonomy: Navigating the External Financing of Development - 1/2
Session Chair: Dr. Andrew Martin Fischer, Institute of Social Studies (The Hague), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Miguel Rivera-Quinones, University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico (U.S.)

This panel invites papers that examine the precise mechanisms by which external finance is mobilised and utilised by developing countries governments for development purposes, whether these are focused on industrial policy or other productive activities, infrastructural financing, or else domestic social expenditures. The aim is to explore the underlying tensions between bilateral and multilateral donors on one hand, and developing country governments on the other, regarding policy autonomy versus donor attempts to influence national policy agendas, with the aim to deepen our analysis of the challenges of international redistribution as a crucial element of global solidarity. Exploration of the role of commercial sources of financing to both public and private actors is also welcome.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-HP052: Inclusive Development, Climate Change, the SDGs and Social Justice: The Problem of Stranded Resources and Assets
Session Chair: Prof. Joyeeta Gupta, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Barbara Hogenboom, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The

Climate change requires drastic restructuring of global society. This will lead to winners and losers and will require increased levels of global solidarity. For example, countries are being asked to not use their fossil fuel reserves (which makes such reserves a stranded resource) and move from fossil fuel infrastructure to renewable energy infrastructure (which makes fossil fuel infrastructure a stranded asset). In the context of the Sustainable Development Goals, the question is what kinds of development (e.g. inclusive development/ post development/ de growth) and related measures are needed to leave fossil fuels underground and address climate change in a socially just manner?

EADI Working Group: Inclusive Development

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-HP059: Solidarity for Investment-Induced Displacement and Resettlement
Session Chair: Dr. Kei Otsuki, Utrecht University, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Griet Steel, Utrecht University, Netherlands, The

In this panel, we aim to address what solidarity actually means in often contested land-based investments that induce displacement and resettlement in rural and urban areas. We are particularly interested in papers that analyze cases in which various actors’ roles and chains of effects unfold in processes of displacement and resettlement in the global south. We will be also interested in discussing methodological issues pertaining to our responsibilities of doing research on this issue.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-RT019: Can Donor Commissioned Development Research Be Independent?
Session Chair: Prof. Dirk-Jan Koch, Radboud University, Netherlands, The

Billions of euros are invested into global development to address inequality, poverty and political marginalisation, also in connection with climate change and other environmental threats. However, with these large investments, also into research, donor politics enter the arena. This year again cases surfaced where the independence of donor commissioned academic research was violated. Academics were asked to modify conclusions, or attempts were made to prevent academics from publishing their work. In this round table the ethical dilemmas around the independence of donor commissioned development research are discussed, with academics who have been battling to maintain their independence and research coordinators at donor agencies who aim to balance research relevance with research independence.

Confirmed speakers:

Professor Charlotte Watts - Chief Scientific Advisor of the Foreign Commonwealth & Development Office

Professor Carine Ronsmans - London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Professor Valery Ridde - Centre Population et Développement (Ceped), Institut de recherche pour le développement (IRD)

Frank Klinckenberg - Director at Klinckenberg consultants

 

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-RT072: The Changing World of Northern NGO Sectors
Session Chair: Dr. Lau Schulpen, Radboud University, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Nicola Banks, University of Manchester, UK, United Kingdom

For long, Northern NGOs were considered the forefront of international solidarity. Over the years, critique grew as did the idea that INGOs are perhaps more part of the problem than of the solution. This critique then goes hand in hand with the idea that the world of Northern NGO sectors is consisting of comparable INGOs that are in crisis. Recent studies of (changes within) these sectors in the UK, the Netherlands, Canada and Norway, show that such a view is incorrect. That does not mean these national NGO sectors are one-on-one comparable.

The roundtable summarises the main developments in the national NGO sectors in the UK, the Netherlands and Canada emerging from the foregoing workshop and discusses the ‘why’ behind the developments. We do this together with directors from British, Dutch, and Canadian INGOs.

NB: Sessions 5-RT072 and 6-WS072 are consecutive sessions:

The first session under the title ‘The changing world of Northern NGO sectors’ (5-RT072) presents the cases below, and uses break out rooms to tease out where the findings converge and diverge.

  • United Kingdom (Nicola Banks and Dan Brockington),
  • Canada (John-Michael Davis)
  • The Netherlands (Lau Schulpen).

 The second (workshop) session of ‘The changing world of Northern NGO sectors’ (6-WS072) will build on the findings presented in the first session (5-RT072) .

With the collaboration of:

Leela Shanti (Small International Development Charities Network, UK)

Bart Romijn (Partos, the Netherlands)

Greg Madeley (Hands Across the Nation, Canada).

 

These speakers will situate these findings within the current climates facing their respective INGO sectors. We will discuss and debate with speakers and participants three key issues:

1. The future of the small NGO

2. In the context of #Shiftthepower debates happening around INGOs and local partner organisations, do we need to be having a similar discussion in donor countries which display such uneven sectors in incomes and expenditures?

3. What role has and will the Covid-19 challenge play in INGO sectors currently and moving forwards?

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-RT200: Teaching and Learning Across Cultures in the International Classroom
Session Chair: Dr. Freek Schiphorst, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Kees Biekart, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The

In development studies we learn (and teach) in a very diverse and international setting: the International Intercultural Classroom. By this we generally mean a learning setting with dozens of different nationalities and backgrounds, even though each student enters the classroom with very different expectations and educational experiences. This Round Table will discuss opportunities as well as limitations (and/or challenges) of this Global Intercultural Classroom, also presenting findings from recent research. We explore perspectives from students as well as from teachers.

Facilitators: Freek Schiphorst (ISS) and Kees Biekart (ISS)

Round table participants:

Dr Adwoa Gyapong – ISS External Researcher (Ghana)

Daniele Rossi Doria -  ISS PhD Researcher & ISS Alumnus (Italy)

Dr Sara van Kinsbergen – Programme Director of the Advanced Master in International Development (AMID) - Radboud University (Netherlands)

Harriet Kos – Lecturer at Rotterdam College of Applied Sciences & ISS Alumna (Netherlands)

Dr Tiina Kontinen – Associate Professor; Coordinator of the International Master's Degree Programme for Development, Education and International Cooperation (DEICO), University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-SP053: Small- Versus Big-Holders: A Debate on Rural Development Trajectories for the Global South
Session Chair: Prof. Maarten Bavinck, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The

This panel will debate a classical theme of development studies: the choice between a trajectory based on a few large, efficient firms and one that depends on a collection of autonomous peasants, or smallholders. Is ‘small’ indeed more beautiful than ‘big’? Or is ‘big’ more effective than ‘small’? Which trajectory is more capable of addressing the challenges of the future: providing sufficient food, reducing poverty, lessening environmental degradation, providing employment and lowering societal inequalities? We will discuss these topics in the context of agro-based, rural economies (fisheries, forestry, agriculture) of the Global South.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-SP065: Critically Examining Frugal Innovation
Session Chair: Prof. Peter Knorringa, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Elsie Onsongo, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The

This seed panel seeks to provide a platform to present new (ideas for) research to critically examine the developmental impacts of frugal innovation. We invite scholars and practitioners to submit for example work in progress on assessing the quantity and quality of employment generated through frugal innovations, on the environmental impacts, on the role of solidarity in grass-root innovations and on the legitimacy of frugal innovations developed by local and international companies. Moreover, we also invite meso- and macro-level conceptual and empirical contributions that critically reflect upon accumulation trajectories, economic transformation, and the governance and political economy of frugal innovations.

EADI Working Group: Frugal Innovation and Development

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-SP110: Ethical and Practical Challenges of Participatory Development Research
Session Chair: Dr. Sonja Marzi, The London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Elisabet Dueholm Rasch, Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands, The

Critiques of development research methodology have opened up avenues for ‘doing’ development research in participatory and collaborative ways that contribute to solidarity and social justice. In many contexts research participants demand to be included and have a say about research design, process and dissemination. At the same time, the neoliberal university and funding mechanisms often remain focused on outputs, rather than on process, which makes it difficult to do research in a participatory way. Drawing on researchers’ experiences with applying participatory methods this session aims at exploring critical and innovative research methodologies in development studies that include a participatory approach.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-WS015: Solidarity as Key Ingredient to Influence Land Rights Policies in Severely Restricted Civic Space Contexts
Session Chair: Dr. Saskia van Veen, Oxfam Novib, Netherlands, The

Access to land has become one of the most contentious public issues in many countries we work in. Civic space is shrinking severely, as partner CSOs increasingly face threats and limitations in defending land rights, and land disputes become increasingly intense. Oxfam Novib experiences in different countries that building solidarity among CSOs helps to remain influential on land rights policies in restricted civic space contexts. In this session, Oxfam Novib will share the experiences of local partners in Vietnam and/or Cambodia who remained influential on land rights through solidarity in alliances and will invite academic speakers to share their insights on solidariy as a key factor when influencing land rights in shrinking civic space.

Presenters:

Mr. Vannara Ouk - Deputy Executive Director of the NGO Forum

Mr Pham Quang Tu - Deputy Country Director at Oxfam in Vietnam

Panelists:

The presenters mentioned above, and:

Barbara Oosters - Civic space policy advisor and influencer Oxfam Novib

Selma Zijlstra - PhD-candidate Anthropology and Development, Radboud University Nijmegen.

Marja Spierenburg - professor Anthropology of Sustainability and Livelihood at Leiden University

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-WS025: Defying Resistance: Feminist and Queer Responses to Anti-Progressive Opposition
Session Chair: Dr. Esther Miedema, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Nicky Pouw, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Christoforos-Dimitrios Zafeiris, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Feminist and queer activists and movements around the world have long evoked resistance and had to respond to efforts to silence those who speak out about questions of rights, particularly when these rights concern, for example, people of colour, undocumented migrants or religious minorities. The rise of right-wing nationalist parties, normalization of racist, misogynist and transphobic discourses, and increasing legal and financial restrictions on social justice movements requires activists to find (new) ways to build communities and promote their goals. Additionally, concerns regarding climate change, conflict and growing social inequality more broadly means activists have to find ways to counter arguments that the issues they raise are too narrow given today’s global challenges.

This workshop seeks to explore how activist movements and communities around the world are responding to ‘anti-progressive’ agendas and strategies, acknowledging that responses need to be part of a long-term struggle against growing social inequalities and need to enact micro-politics of the ‘here and now.’ We depart from the premise that silencing takes place in diverse settings and relationships across various scales, and takes varying forms, but also that these differing modes of silencing relate to each other. Additionally, we acknowledge that practices of silencing will vary in offline and online environments, and seek to better understand how digital silencing shapes new forms of activism, for example, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The workshop is geared to identifying various ways in which feminist and queer activists may be circumventing silencing and closing spaces. Careful attention will be paid to how race, nationality and religion shapes how the forms of silencing, and how activists respond. The workshop will explore what these other/new forms of activism mean in terms of creating political leverage and promoting equality.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm5-WS119: Regenerating Inclusive Education: A Co-Created Workshop on Contemplative-Social Justice Pedagogies in International Development Studies
Session Chair: Dr. Mieke Lopes Cardozo, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Annet Kragt, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, The

Co-created by a team of students and a senior lecturer of International Development Studies, this workshop welcomes participants to explore and challenge education’s potential value for social justice, connecting to personal and institutional transformation(s). We draw on our experience of co-creating a (Comenius) teaching innovation titled ‘Critical Development and Diversity Explorations” (CDDE) at the University of Amsterdam, since 2017. We look forward to engaging in contemplative-social justice pedagogies and developing critical reflections on the inclusiveness of our respective teaching programmes in International Development Studies and/or similar areas. Will you join us in exploring the regenerative potential of inclusive education?

 
12:15pm - 12:30pmBreak
 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-HP039 - 2/2: Between Financial Dependence and Policy Autonomy: Navigating the External Financing of Development - 2/2
Session Chair: Dr. Andrew Martin Fischer, Institute of Social Studies (The Hague), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Miguel Rivera-Quinones, University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico (U.S.)

This panel invites papers that examine the precise mechanisms by which external finance is mobilised and utilised by developing countries governments for development purposes, whether these are focused on industrial policy or other productive activities, infrastructural financing, or else domestic social expenditures. The aim is to explore the underlying tensions between bilateral and multilateral donors on one hand, and developing country governments on the other, regarding policy autonomy versus donor attempts to influence national policy agendas, with the aim to deepen our analysis of the challenges of international redistribution as a crucial element of global solidarity. Exploration of the role of commercial sources of financing to both public and private actors is also welcome.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-HP125: The Makeshift City
Session Chair: Dr. Naomi van Stapele, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Joop de Wit, International Institute of Social Studies ISS, Netherlands, The

This panel engages with urban development, governance and politics to explore multiple crises affecting cities. The concept ‘the makeshift city’ is key, especially how this connects to solidarity initiatives by and among citizens. This notion not only captures the haphazard and unplanned ways many cities develop but also brings in view emerging opportunities for urban inclusivity, peace building and social justice. This panel interrogates arrangements of housing, services and security in which citizens initiate collaborations with government, corporate actors and/or CSOs with the aim to encourage multi-stakeholder collaborations that build from rather than operate against local connections, knowledges and practices.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-RT023: Aid and Development: Looking Back, Thinking Ahead
Session Chair: Dr. Geske Dijkstra, Erasmus Universiteit, Department Public Administration and Sociologygy, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Nadia Molenaers, Univeristy of Antwerpn, Belgium

This Roundtable hosts a discussion amongst peers to reflect on: 1) the scientific lessons that can be drawn from research on the impact of aid promoting socio-economic change and social justice 2) current trends in aid and in the aid environment, and how they enable or constrain socio-economic change, and 3)  what the future holds for aid as a catalyst for socio-economic change and social justice. We formulate three questions, and ask panel members to give their responses or reflections on these questions. For each question, another panel member will start. After the reflections of the panel members, a discussion with the audience follows.

The three questions are:

  1. Given the increased aid fragmentation, and also increased remittances and direct foreign investment, when will we see the end of traditional ODA? And why bother?
  2. How can we explain the huge increase in attention for monitoring and evaluation of development aid, and at the same time the reduced space and attention for evidence-based policy making in aid?
  3. Given the multiplicity of actors, and the return of aid policies under the foreign policy objective, how can we give new meanings to solidarity? How can aid (ODA) contribute to social justice? Aid for alleviating poverty or aid for GPGs? Or just give money to the poor?

Confirmed speakers:

Sarah Delputte - Ghent University

Mohammad Mizanur Rahman - Independent researcher from Bangladesh

Jörg Faust - DIE, German Development Institute

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-RT071: How Do We Academically Reflect on How We "Know" the World?
Session Chair: Dr. Julia Schöneberg, University of Kassel, Germany
Session Chair: Dr. Lata Narayanaswamy, University of Leeds, UK, United Kingdom

How do we “know” the world? It is so vast a question that it feels impossible to answer. Yet this question is not a call to take an inventory of specific facts or perspectives, but is asked in order to frame a more critical and reflexive approach to the assumptions that underpin (Eurocentric and Western) academic perceptions of WHAT counts as knowledge, HOW we capture and communicate that knowledge and WHO gets to both shape and present ideas as academic (read: expert) knowledge.

In attempting to tackle these questions a group of researchers from the Global South and North came together for a workshop sponsored by the European Association of Development and Training Institutes (EADI) and convened/hosted by Convivial Thinking. We aimed to bridge different disciplinary “silos” and connect scholars from diverse fields in the social sciences, including conflict studies, sociology, philosophy and history, alongside practitioners. One of the main questions was: How do we tackle epistemic asymmetries and practice alternative models of conducting research, conceptualising teaching and building collaborations? 

This session presents results from a collaborative writing process among members of the Convivial Thinking Collective. We hope to also engage and learn from experiences of everyone attending.

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Su-Ming Khoo - National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway, Ireland

Dr Chris Millora  - University of East Anglia, UK

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-RT103: Gender, Sexuality and Social Justice: Unpacking Dominant Development and Policy Discourses
Session Chair: Dr. Silke Heumann, EUR, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Ana Victoria Portocarrero Lacayo, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Brenda Rodríguez, ISS, Netherlands, The

This roundtable explores the intersections of gender, sexuality and social justice. It aims to contribute to more meaningful solidarity efforts towards peace and social justice by critically engaging with binary, heteronormative and ethnocentric assumptions around gender, sexuality and race, underlying public policies, and development interventions. It brings scholars from four different regions who are at the crossroads of academia and multiple professional and activist engagements, shaping debates, struggles and policies in relation to development and social justice issues. The studies are based on original research and offer nuanced theoretical and methodological approaches from an intersectional feminist lens.

Confirmed speakers:

Hellen Venganai -  Women's University in Africa, Harare, Zimbabwe: Gender, sexuality and culture; power-knowledge in development interventions

Mohammad Ibrahim Khalad - Australian National University Australia and Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh: migration, islamophobia and masculinities

Brenda Rodríguez - México, ISS, The Hague The Netherlands: sexual subjectivities, teen pregnancy

Ana Victoria Portocarrero -  Nicaragua, ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands: sexuality, feminist economics

Silke Heumann - ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands: gender and sexual politics, intersectional feminism, social movements

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-RT201: Implications of European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and FAIR Data for Youth-Employment in Africa
Session Chair: Prof. Mirjam van Reisen, Tilburg University, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Antony Otieno Ong’ayo, Erasmus University, Netherlands, The

The new economy is driven by data. Recent advancements in digital technology and computation, a large volume of data is generated instantly and at a very high speed. While this development facilitates significant advancement in data science and  general use of technology (hardware and software) and applications for various solutions (communication, health, finance, agriculture, education and research), challenges remain with regards to issues around digital divide (between and within global geographical locations),  governance, security and privacy concerns. Access to data increasingly becomes a challenge due to the large volume of data, which is not possible to move, which at the same remain inaccessible and not reusable due to the invisibility and fragmentation. The EU has responded by embracing the European Open Science Could and FAIR-data: data as machine- and human readable: Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR).

The new generation Internet of FAIR Data and Services will present a revolutionary way forward to knowledge, research, and services. How will Africa benefit from this? This is especially relevant in the context of the growing concerns that youth employment needs to be addressed, looking at the demographic of a fast-growing African population with globally the largest youth segment. In what way is the EU ensuring that capacities are built so that African youth can connect to these critical economic developments?

The GO FAIR initiative, the GO FAIR Implementation Network Africa and the GO FAIR Ambassadors Implementation Network explore how the latest technological advancements in data science can benefit youth employment in Africa. To do so, we give attention such issues as distributed learning on federated data, Data stewardship competences, Scaling FAIR to industry and global goals (SDGs), how to make your data discoverable, data governance and computing for societies.  The EU is planning a 100 billion research programme based on FAIR principles. How will African researchers and young people benefit from these new opportunities and participate in the data-driven new economy? What will the EU do to take up its responsibility to internationalise FAIR and create economic opportunities for all, in its multi-annual programme to be agreed for the period 2020-2027.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-SP030: Social Inclusion of Rural-Urban Migrants in South-East Asia
Session Chair: Dr. Edward Lahiff, University College Cork, Ireland

Rural-urban migrants in South-East Asia, often poor and relatively unskilled, struggle to establish themselves in urban spaces, and face a range of social, economic and bureaucratic barriers to achieving access to decent work and social benefits. Civil society organisations attempt to fill the gaps in policy, but often face hostility from the state. Social inclusion depends on solidarity between rural and urban people, and across social classes, and contributes greatly to peace and social justice. Papers are invited that address current challenges of social inclusion at the level of theory, international comparative studies and country-specific empirical studies.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-SP069: Climate-Resilient Development and Social Justice: Squaring the Circle?
Session Chair: Dr. Edith Kuerzinger, PREMAnet e.V., Germany
Session Chair: Prof. Darley Jose Kjosavik, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Stefano Moncada, University of Malta, Malta

The window to avert irreversible climate-change, biodiversity loss, vulnerability, and social inequalities is rapidly closing. We invite voices from innovative research, education, and practice to present ideas, sketches, concepts, success stories, research-frameworks and findings, which trigger transformational change towards socially just, peaceful, and climate-resilient societies. An interactive “seed-panel” will allow exchange of views and cooperation among actors involved in climate-resilient change based on solidarity, social justice and peace. Key concepts: innovative/multidisciplinary approaches to climate-resilient, inclusive, and peaceful pathways; vulnerability and resilience (e.g. gender, marginalized social groups, and small island developing states); substitution of fossil by renewable resources accounting for social justice and solidarity.

EADI Working Group: Climate-Resilient Development

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-SP077: Making Solidarity Sexy, Funny, and Cool? Challenges of Framing Interventions and Engaging the Public in Development and Humanitarianism
Session Chair: Prof. Lisa Ann Richey, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

The increasing ‘privatization of helping’ in both its material and symbolic forms has made engaging in international development and humanitarianism a desirable practice that can be ‘sexy’, ‘funny’ and ‘cool’. Development outcomes themselves become so imbued with ‘symbolic’ and ‘ethical’ value that they are used to market consumer goods through virtual and interactive products where the spectacle or experience itself becomes a commodity. The ways in which these new engagements are experienced in the Global South and their effect on intercultural aid relations are in need of further study and reflection. We invite papers (full or draft, including fieldwork reflections) to engage new and ongoing scholarship on the diverse forms of public engagements (virtual and legacy) in humanitarianism and international development (which could include among others, online activism, fundraising, interventions, disaster relief, charity, remittances and Corporate Social Responsibility CSR).

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-WS001: Creative Education for Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice: An Interactive Workshop on Innovative Teaching in Higher Education
Session Chair: Dr. Anke Schwittay, Department of International Development, University of Sussex, UK, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Paul Robert Gilbert, University of Sussex, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Elizabeth Anne Mills, University of Sussex, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Suda Perera, University of Sussex, UK, United Kingdom

This workshop will facilitate the co-construction of creative ideas for teaching Justice and Global Development at the higher education level. Participants will be invited to reflect collectively on the who, what and how of our university teaching practices and to experiment with various ways in which these practices can be made more inclusive, experiential and diverse. The rationale for this workshop is that teaching is a critical but often neglected aspect of solidarity, peace and social justice practice, as it educates the next generation of change makers who will need to embrace both critique and creativity to tackle the complex social, economic and environmental challenges we face.

No abstract submission possible for Workshop Sessions.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-WS060: Mapping Injustices for Solidarity: A Methods Workshop
Session Chair: Dr. Javier Martinez, University of Twente, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Diana Reckien, University of Twente, the Netherlands, Germany
Session Chair: Prof. Karin Pfeffer, University of Twente, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Christine Richter, Fraunhofer Center for International Management and Knowledge Economy IMW, Germany, Germany
Session Chair: Sandeep Balagangadharan Menon, KRVIA Mumbai, India

Let’s make unjust conditions visible! In this workshop participants will map unjust conditions that are invisible, ignored, or concealed. What can be achieved? We will discuss to what extent mapping injustice can be embedded and transformative. We will use a combination of spatial and crossmedia (maps, photography, moving image, sound) to locate and characterize unjust conditions and inequities in urban areas. We argue that a first step towards solidarity is taken if injustices are made visible. We advocate for empathic representations of urban conditions, where maps are used to bring different realities together.

No abstract submission possible for Workshop Sessions.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm6-WS072: The Changing World of Northern NGO Sectors
Session Chair: Dr. Lau Schulpen, Radboud University, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Nicola Banks, University of Manchester, UK, United Kingdom

For long, Northern NGOs were considered the forefront of international solidarity. Over the years, critique grew as did the idea that INGOs are perhaps more part of the problem than of the solution. This critique then goes hand in hand with the idea that the world of Northern NGO sectors is consisting of comparable INGOs that are in crisis. Recent studies of (changes within) these sectors in the UK, the Netherlands, Canada and Norway, show that such a view is incorrect. That does not mean these national NGO sectors are one-on-one comparable.

In the workshop, academic speakers briefly present developments in their own national NGO sectors (the UK, the Netherlands and Canada respectively). This is followed by breakout sessions and a final plenary discussion where we compare these findings across different national NGO sectors and tease out where the findings converge and diverge. The workshop thus provides the basis for understanding developments of NGO sectors in selected countries (what are these developments over time and how do they compare?).

NB: Sessions 5-RT072 and 6-WS072 are consecutive sessions:

The first session under the title ‘The changing world of Northern NGO sectors’ (5-RT072) presents the cases below, and uses break out rooms to tease out where the findings converge and diverge.

  • United Kingdom (Nicola Banks and Dan Brockington),
  • Canada (John-Michael Davis)
  • The Netherlands (Lau Schulpen).

 The second (workshop) session of ‘The changing world of Northern NGO sectors’ (6-WS072) will build on the findings presented in the first session (5-RT072) .

With the collaboration of:

Leela Shanti (Small International Development Charities Network, UK)

Bart Romijn (Partos, the Netherlands)

Greg Madeley (Hands Across the Nation, Canada).

 

These speakers will situate these findings within the current climates facing their respective INGO sectors. We will discuss and debate with speakers and participants three key issues:

1. The future of the small NGO

2. In the context of #Shiftthepower debates happening around INGOs and local partner organisations, do we need to be having a similar discussion in donor countries which display such uneven sectors in incomes and expenditures?

3. What role has and will the Covid-19 challenge play in INGO sectors currently and moving forwards?

 
1:45pm - 3:30pmBreak
 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy (NIMD): The Dilemma of Democracy Promotion

Democracy was a key international standard for many years, firmly anchored in conventions, declarations and commitments, as well as in national laws. This standard is now challenged as only one of several governance options. China is ensuring buy in for its autocratic model by supporting developing countries. Democracies have until now failed to formulate a joint strategy regarding the rise of autocracy, in order to curb the tide. The EU member states are divided; opposing geopolitical and economic interests hamper joint policy-making. The result: more than one-third of the world’s population currently live under authoritarian rule. This virtual visit to NIMD will discuss democracy trends worldwide and NIMD’s response. In addition, the dilemmas faced by democracy promotion programmes will be highlighted and discussed with the visitors.

Facilitator:

Reem Judeh - Senior Programme and Knowledge Advisor, NIMD

Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy (NIMD): https://nimd.org/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Both ENDS : How to Upscale Bottom-up and Planet-friendly Practices?

Both ENDS is a Dutch NGO with an extensive network of partner organisations around the world working on the intersection of environmental justice and human rights. From the grassroots level to international policy spaces, our goal is to realise a sustainable, fair and inclusive world for all. We convene and share information about policy and investments that have a direct impact on people and their livelihood, we engage in joint advocacy, we stimulate the dialogue between stakeholders and we promote and support the massive upscaling and mainstreaming of bottom-up, planet-friendly practices. Those practices (such as community-led restoration, inclusive land & water governance and agroecology) have the ability to bring about transformative change. In order for them to be further upscaled, favourable governance systems and financial mechanisms need to be established. Both ENDS asks visitors to reflect on and provide concrete ideas for ways of how the upscaling of such transformative practices can be realised?

Facilitators:

Danielle Hirsch - Director Both Ends

Stefan Schüller - Project officer

Both ENDS: https://www.bothends.org/en/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Cordaid: The Changing Role of INGOs and the Added Value of Cordaid

Cordaid is an internationally operating value-based emergency relief and development organization, working in and on fragility. We stand with those who are hit hardest by poverty and conflict. We support them in their struggle to move beyond survival and to fully participate in equitable and resilient societies. Together with its partners, Cordaid creates effective and durable solutions.  We contribute with services in thematic expertise, program & grant management, and investment management as contribution to international cooperation aims. In this session we showcase some videos of our work, and we will explore - together with you – the changing role of INGOs and the added value of Cordaid in international development cooperation.  

Organizers:

Alinda Bosch - Manager Knowledge and Innovation, convener

Izabella Toth - Head of External Relations and Business Development) Bram Peters (Business Developer

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Free Press Unlimited: People Deserve to Know - All Over the World

Around the world, journalists face an increasing level of repression, violence and intimidation. Governments intimidate and censor dissenting voices, also in the digital space. Criminal gangs threaten those who report on corruption. The result is that journalists exercise self-censorship, leave the profession, disappear into exile or stay silent. Free Press Unlimited (FPU) supports local media professionals and journalists, particularly in countries with limited (press) freedom. The visit to Free Press Unlimited will discuss recent activities and campaigns that contribute to a sustainable, professional and diverse media landscape.

Free Press Unlimited: https://www.freepressunlimited.org/en 

With:

Leon Willems - Director FPU

Jantine van Herwijnen - FPU Emergency Fund

Evelien Wijkstra - Policy and Advocacy

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Liliane Foundation: Disability Rights Matter

The Liliane Foundation aims at giving children and youngsters with disabilities, in developing countries access to medical and social rehabilitation. One characteristic of this assistance is that it is provided in collaboration with local contact persons through direct, small-scaled and tailor-made help, supporting the children’s personal growth and furthering the children’s integration in society. The help involves medical treatment, surgery, appliances, education, vocational training and income generating projects. Join us and get to know our work and why disability rights matter.

Discussion question: How can we mainstream disability rights within the field of international development so that all organizations are disability inclusive?

Liliane Foundation: https://www.lilianefonds.org/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - PAX: A Virtual Trip Through Lebanon

Lebanon is going through a difficult time: economic hardship, an ongoing pandemic, political deadlock and corruption and a highly polarised society. However, there is hope! Many creative and inspiring activists throughout the country are creating the space to bring people together and demand an accountable government. These people have the future, and it’s these people that PAX works with. We invite you to a virtual trip through Lebanon, getting to know some of PAX’ partners and work on arts and culture for peace and human rights activism in the different Lebanese regions. During an active and inspiring session you will be asked to think along to address some of the most pressing challenges we identify in our work. Hope to meet you there!

Pax for Peace: click here for more information  

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Simavi: Shifting Power to Women and Girls

Join this virtual visit to engage in discussions about how INGOs need to change and what change can Simavi bring about. Simavi is a Dutch development organisation that exists since 1925. We are agile and adaptive. We co-create and work directly with our in-country partners, making us efficient in achieving a lasting change in the lives of women and girls. In terms of decolonising the aid sector, and shifting the power to the most affected populations, we realised that we - as an international NGO - should take responsibility, take a good look in the mirror, and recognise that we are part of the problem.

To bring about more just and effective development, Simavi is conscious about how to use its own power in support of women- and girl-led development. We might not be big enough to revolutionise the world, but surely, we want to attempt to make the world a better place. But how do we do that? How do we become more girl-led in our strategies, programmes and partnerships?

Facilitators:

Esther de Vreede

Sever Dzigurski

Simavi: https://simavi.nl/en

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Task Team CSO: Promoting Effective CSO Engagement in Development

The Task Team on CSO Development Effectiveness and Enabling Environment (Task Team) is a multi-stakeholder coalition formed by three stakeholder groups: development cooperation providers (donors), partner country governments, and civil society organizations (CSOs). Together we work on furthering effective CSO participation in development processes. As part of its work, the Task Team raises awareness of international commitments on the CSO enabling environment and CSO development effectiveness and offers guidance, evidence and practical tools to further their implementation. This is underpinned by research conducted by academics affiliated with the International Institute of Social Studies. The main tools developed by the Task Team are the Guidance & Good Practice and the Online Interactive Guidance. These tools are designed to build awareness on the need to engage CSOs in development processes. Join us as we give you a glimpse of these tools that offer a practical approach towards promoting effective CSO engagement in development.

Facilitator:

Vanessa de Oliveira - Senior Policy Office, Task Team Secretariat

Task Team on CSO Development Effectiveness and Enabling Environment: https://taskteamcso.com/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - The Hague Academy: Local Authorities, Civil Society, and Peace Building

What roles can local authorities and civil society play in peacebuilding and local security? How can development partners improve their support to local actors working on conflict transformation and sustaining peace? Join a virtual visit to The Hague Academy for Local Governance and explore these vital questions in an interactive and lively exchange. The Hague Academy is a non-profit training institute that specialises in practice oriented training courses for professionals working in development and local governance. In this session, you will also have the opportunity to learn about their capacity strengthening programmes in the field of peacebuilding, rule of law and local security in countries such as Pakistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Yemen, and you will get an idea of potential cooperation opportunities with this dynamic and innovative organisation.

Facilitators:

Nicolas Haezebrouck - Governance specialist and trainer

Kelly Buis - Board member of Just Peace and of World Connectors

The Hague Academy for Local Governance: https://thehagueacademy.com/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

               

 

 
3:30pm - 4:30pmVirtual Visit - Transnational Institute (TNI): What Role Can Activist Scholars Play in Movements for Systemic Change?

For nearly 50 years, the Transnational Institute (TNI) has served to bridge academia and social movements. This session will bring together staff and associates to reflect on this history, its lessons and experiences. What is scholar-activism? Why do we need scholar activists? What kinds of research can play a strategic role in supporting social movements? What are the challenges for social movements in working with academics?

Organisers:

Fiona Dove - Executive Director of Transnational Institute (TNI)

Daniel Chavez - ISS alumni, coordinator of TNI’s New Politics Lab, co-editor of Public Water and Covid-19: Dark Clouds and Silver Linings (MSP/CLACSO/TNI, 2021)

Satoko Kishimoto - Programme coordinator of TNI’s Public Alternatives, co-author The future is public (2020), Reclaiming Public Services (2017), Our Public Water Future (2015)

Transnational Institute (TNI): https://www.tni.org/en

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
4:30pm - 5:00pmBreak
 
5:00pm - 6:00pmButterfly Bar 3

If you prefer to have a bilateral meeting with another conference participant, or a small group, you can meet up in the Butterfly Bar over a drink. Just go to the Bar, where ISS students will receive you in a pleasant setting. You can also come randomly and see who is around. Oh, and please don’t forget to bring your own drink!

 
5:00pm - 6:00pmCoffee Corner Session 3

After the panel sessions you may want to continue talking informally with your colleagues about the panels in your stream that have just ended. For that purpose the Coffee Corner sessions are created. Go to the Coffee corner, and choose your favourite stream from one of the break-out group topics. Of course, you can join any stream of your liking: on a panel you missed, or just to hear which questions were raised in another stream. The streams can be found in the confernece manual here

 
Date: Thursday, 08/July/2021
 Technical Assistance Room

If you are unable to reach the technical room through the Zoom Link, please write to us at eadi2021@iss.nl. You can also reach the technical room by Telephone:

Phone: +31616801052

WhatsApp: +31616801052

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Both ENDS : How to upscale bottom-up and planet-friendly practices?

Both ENDS is a Dutch NGO with an extensive network of partner organisations around the world working on the intersection of environmental justice and human rights. From the grassroots level to international policy spaces, our goal is to realise a sustainable, fair and inclusive world for all. We convene and share information about policy and investments that have a direct impact on people and their livelihood, we engage in joint advocacy, we stimulate the dialogue between stakeholders and we promote and support the massive upscaling and mainstreaming of bottom-up, planet-friendly practices. Those practices (such as community-led restoration, inclusive land & water governance and agroecology) have the ability to bring about transformative change. In order for them to be further upscaled, favourable governance systems and financial mechanisms need to be established. Both ENDS asks visitors to reflect on and provide concrete ideas for ways of how the upscaling of such transformative practices can be realised?

Facilitators:

Danielle Hirsch - Director Both Ends

Stefan Schüller - Project officer

Both ENDS: https://www.bothends.org/en/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Free Press Unlimited: People deserve to know - All over the world

Around the world, journalists face an increasing level of repression, violence and intimidation. Governments intimidate and censor dissenting voices, also in the digital space. Criminal gangs threaten those who report on corruption. The result is that journalists exercise self-censorship, leave the profession, disappear into exile or stay silent. Free Press Unlimited (FPU) supports local media professionals and journalists, particularly in countries with limited (press) freedom. The visit to Free Press Unlimited will discuss recent activities and campaigns that contribute to a sustainable, professional and diverse media landscape.

Free Press Unlimited: https://www.freepressunlimited.org/en 

With:

Leon Willems - Director FPU

Jantine van Herwijnen - FPU Emergency Fund

Evelien Wijkstra - Policy and Advocacy

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Hivos : Popular Culture and Narrative Change

How do we shift norms and attitudes among the wider public? How to influence the silent majority of people who don’t have a fixed opinion about controversial societal issues and tend to follow the socially accepted norms in society?

For many years, Hivos has supported the creative work of those artists, musicians, film makers and digital media producers that critically question dominant norms in society. But also appeal to a broader audience. During this virtual visit we will present their work. We will discuss the role of popular culture and creative campaigning in shifting norms and attitudes among the general public.

Facilitators:

Takura Zhanghaza - Global Programme Manager R.O.O.M

Arthur Steiner - Digital Specialist

Hivos: https://hivos.org/

Hivos Solidarity 'Playbook' on Popular Culture & Content Creation: https://solidarityaction.network/media/Hivos.pdf

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Human Security Collective: A Mentorship Approach to Inclusive Leadership in Conflict-affected Contexts

Human Security Collective (HSC) is a foundation with a strong background in development, conflict transformation and security. We operate worldwide on involving citizens and their communities on issues of security, working on the belief that the idea of human security provides an organizing frame for security and rights action.

In this session, we will take you through one of the pillars of our work: our Inclusive Leadership approach in conflict-affected contexts, where we use mentorship as a starting point. As practitioners, we will share with you the aims and outcomes of our programs, and our working principles. Together with you, we will then collaboratively discuss some of the pre-conditions needed to make such an approach successful, some of the dilemmas inherent in doing this work, and some ways of addressing those dilemmas.

Facilitators:

Thalia Malmberg

Siebrich Visser

Sangeeta Goswami

Human Security Collective: https://www.hscollective.org/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - IofC: Faith in Human Rights @75 (in The Hague)

The visitors will receive an introduction to the work of Initiatives of Change (IofC) and the Faith in Human Rights programme (FiHR). This programme focuses on the city of The Hague and its human rights culture. The Hague is branded as the international city of peace and justice, yet it is also one of the most segregated cities in the Netherlands. Even though The Hague features a number of prestigious human rights organisation, they are not accessible to all members of society. IofC aims to make human rights discourse understandable to and inclusive for all its diverse citizens, including those affected by poverty or obscurity. The session will provide plenty of space for discussion.

Facilitator:

Dr Willem Jansen

Initiatives of Change: https://www.iofc.org/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Justice & Peace : Shelter City - Side by Side with Human Rights Defenders

The most effective way to promote universal human rights globally is through the support and protection of grassroots human rights defenders. Shelter City is a global movement of cities, organisations and people who stand side by side with human rights defenders at risk. Together with partners in 23 Dutch and international cities, we offer them a safe and inspiring space where they re-energize, receive tailormade support and engage with allies to reinforce their local actions for change. We invite EADI conference visitors to discuss the Shelter City programme with us and to explore new ideas and contacts.

Facilitators:

Sebastiaan van der Zwaan - Director Justice & Peace

Suzan Goes - coordinator Human Rights Defenders and Security program

Justice & Peace: https://justiceandpeace.nl/en/

 

 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy (NIMD): The dilemma of democracy promotion

Democracy was a key international standard for many years, firmly anchored in conventions, declarations and commitments, as well as in national laws. This standard is now challenged as only one of several governance options. China is ensuring buy in for its autocratic model by supporting developing countries. Democracies have until now failed to  formulate a joint strategy regarding the rise of autocracy, in order to curb the tide. The EU member states are divided; opposing geopolitical and economic interests hamper joint policy-making.  The result: more than one-third of the world’s population currently live under authoritarian rule. This virtual visit to NIMD will discuss democracy trends worldwide and NIMD’s response. In addition, the dilemmas faced by democracy promotion programmes will be highlighted and discussed with the visitors.

Facilitator:

Heleen Schrooyen - Senior Advisor Strategic Relations

Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy (NIMD): https://nimd.org/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Oxfam-Novib: Empowering our Partners to Learn and Co-create Knowledge @oxfam

Oxfam Novib works towards a just world without poverty. At the heart of our business is social change: complex, unpredictable and inspiring. We are keen to understand social change and how it works, to learn and improve our ways of working.

Therefore, we have a dedicated unit, called LINK, which focusses on Learning INnovation and Knowledge. The LINK unit leads in the development of knowledge and learning frameworks, ensuring thorough evaluations and research on what works to inform blended and adaptive programming and innovation. Herein, the department facilitates connections with external partners in their areas of work  to contribute to the debate related to development cooperation.

In your visit to Oxfam Novib we will show our work through the eyes of LINK, showing how we co-create knowledge and learning trajectories, conduct rigorous research to inform- and evaluate programmes, and how we ensure a learning culture within Oxfam Novib.

Oxfam-Novib: https://www.oxfamnovib.nl/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - PAX: A Virtual Trip Through Lebanon

Lebanon is going through a difficult time: economic hardship, an ongoing pandemic, political deadlock and corruption and a highly polarised society. However, there is hope! Many creative and inspiring activists throughout the country are creating the space to bring people together and demand an accountable government. These people have the future, and it’s these people that PAX works with. We invite you to a virtual trip through Lebanon, getting to know some of PAX’ partners and work on arts and culture for peace and human rights activism in the different Lebanese regions. During an active and inspiring session you will be asked to think along to address some of the most pressing challenges we identify in our work. Hope to meet you there!

Pax for Peace: click here for more information  

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - Simavi: Shifting Power to Women and Girls

Join this virtual visit to engage in discussions about how INGOs need to change and what change can Simavi bring about. Simavi is a Dutch development organisation that exists since 1925. We are agile and adaptive. We co-create and work directly with our in-country partners, making us efficient in achieving a lasting change in the lives of women and girls. In terms of decolonising the aid sector, and shifting the power to the most affected populations, we realised that we - as an international NGO - should take responsibility, take a good look in the mirror, and recognise that we are part of the problem.

To bring about more just and effective development, Simavi is conscious about how to use its own power in support of women- and girl-led development. We might not be big enough to revolutionise the world, but surely, we want to attempt to make the world a better place. But how do we do that? How do we become more girl-led in our strategies, programmes and partnerships?

Facilitators:

Esther de Vreede

Sever Dzigurski

Simavi: https://simavi.nl/en

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

 
9:30am - 10:30amVirtual Visit - The Hague Academy: Local Authorities, Civil Society, and Peace Building

What roles can local authorities and civil society play in peacebuilding and local security? How can development partners improve their support to local actors working on conflict transformation and sustaining peace? Join a virtual visit to The Hague Academy for Local Governance and explore these vital questions in an interactive and lively exchange. The Hague Academy is a non-profit training institute that specialises in practice oriented training courses for professionals working in development and local governance. In this session, you will also have the opportunity to learn about their capacity strengthening programmes in the field of peacebuilding, rule of law and local security in countries such as Pakistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Yemen, and you will get an idea of potential cooperation opportunities with this dynamic and innovative organisation.

Facilitators:

Nicolas Haezebrouck - Governance specialist and trainer

Kelly Buis - Board member of Just Peace and of World Connectors

The Hague Academy for Local Governance: https://thehagueacademy.com/

More info about virtual visits on the ISS website: https://www.iss.nl/en/eadi-conference-virtual-visits 

               

 

 
10:30am - 11:00amBreak
 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-HP126: New Digital Technologies, Sustainable (Rural) Development and Social Justice
Session Chair: Dr. Oane Visser, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Karin Astrid Siegmann, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Sarah Ruth Sippel, Leipzig University, Germany

Digitalization increasingly affects sustainable global development. Farming apps, GPS-controlled fishing, and forest-monitoring drones are examples of how the ‘digital’ extends into the realm of natural resources. Governments and development actors have embraced these technologies as solutions to global resource scarcity and environmental problems. Yet, digitalization is likely to fundamentally re-shape labour and property related to natural resources, raising concerns about social justice. This panel investigates the implications for those depending on natural resources for their livelihoods (e.g. farmers, fishermen). It aims to provide an interesting (non-urban) angle to debates on automation, algorithmic governance, labour and commodification of data and nature.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-HP136: Governance in Moments where Normality And Exceptionality Meet
Session Chair: Dr. Samantha Melis, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Thea Hilhorst, ISS/EUR, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Isabelle Desportes, Freie Universität Berlin, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Rodrigo Mena, Institute of Social Studies (ISS) of Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

What happens when normality coincides with exceptionality? The compartimentalization of the nomal versus the exceptional in governance frameworks is a key principle to define policy frames. But when the exceptional is the normal, it has major consequences for how we look at issues related to social justice and multi-actor governance. In this panel, academics and practitioners reflect on governance in the grey zones where normality and exceptionality overlap. From survival migrants, to disasters and conflict, and movements of solidarity and resistance for social justice and peace, all challenge the normal-exceptional dichotomy.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-RT013: Narratives That Build Solidarity in Support of Solidarity, Peace and Social Justice
Session Chair: Nicole Walshe, Knowledge Hub Governance & Citizenship, Oxfam Novib, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

Narratives that build solidarity within and across contexts can be powerful tools to protect and strengthen the space to practice the rights of freedom of association, speech and assembly.   These three fundamental rights are key enablers of peace and social justice. Yet as civic space shrinks in many contexts and / or for specific groups of people, it can be harder to express these rights and to build solidarity.  Co-constructing narratives can be a way to connect with different constituencies and build solidarity across groups. We will look at 3 cases of interaction between narrative change and civic space to explore what can be learnt about the impact of narratives on civic space and what other tactics or strategies are also needed to build solidarity and protect civic space.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-RT092: Revealing Hidden, Multiple Knowledges: Solidarity in Practice
Session Chair: Mike Powell, Emergent Works Ltd., UK, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Sarah Cummings, Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands, The

This roundtable aims to introduce and discuss different methods for identifying and engaging with different perspectives and multiple knowledges. Working in solidarity requires listening to the priorities and opinions of those you are aiming to support.  It requires a capacity to find relevant material from a range of sources and to identify people who can contribute to developing and fulfilling common agendas. Poor connections between academic disciplines and between academia, development policy and development practice make this difficult. But the question remains, how do you show these hidden multiple knowledges.

The session comprises a roundtable format with a short introduction followed by five presentations of approximately 5 minutes each.  This, allowing time for people to settle down, would allow for at least 30 minutes of open discussion. In order to increase interactions, we will use a chat wave and, if possible, breakout rooms using a jamboard.

Confirmed speakers:

Sarah Cummings (Chair) - Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands

Márton Demeter - Karoli Gaspar University/ National University of Public Service, Hungary, on Using network science methodologies to identify academic elitism

The educational paths and networks of core staff members (n = 3325) of the world’s top 100 sociology departments. Results show that a significant overrepresentation of central countries and considerable gender bias can be found throughout sociology departments with strong male dominance in high positions. By using an improved word-systemic model for the interpretation of our data, we were able to categorize the main agents and patients in the world-system of global elite sociology, and we could also describe those centripetal and centrifugal forces that absorb and re-educate peripheral talent while excluding those without Western reeducation.

Charles Dhewa - Knowledge Transfer Africa, Zimbabwe, on Literature and stories in conveying knowledge for sustainable development

Ordinary people’s ambitions, aspirations, hesitations, fears and solutions are hidden in the stories they tell and share. Unless you listen at various levels, you may miss some of the important messages and coping mechanisms. To the extent most of the stories that anchor development in Africa have not been documented, African communities thrive on ‘oral literature’. Such stories are the mental software in informal agricultural markets across Africa.  The invisible hand of the market is expressed in stories. Unless somebody begins weaving a story on what is going on, you will be forgiven to think that informal markets are characterized by chaos. Yet it is through stories that prices and rules of the game are set to the benefit of food producers, distributors and consumers

Leah de Haan - Chatham House, UK (young scholar), on Feminist critical discourse analysis to reveal hidden discourses

Critical discourse analysis (CDA) is one type of discourse analysis which aims to ‘understand, expose, and ultimately resist social inequality’ (van Dijk, 2005: 352). To demonstrate its current relevance and efficacy, many authors have used it to analyse the text of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Agenda 2030. The way in which CDA has been, and can be used to reveal the ‘hidden’ dominant, marginal, oppositional or alternative discourses within policy texts, such as policy documents and speeches will be discussed, together with a tool aiming to make CDA easier to apply by non-academics to better understand policy documents.

Mike Powell - Emergent Works, on Revealing thematic links

Topic Maps, as a form of mapping technology, offer the potential to identify the various factors – issues, processes, subjects, people - which may contribute to a particular problem or field of study and the links between them. They can be created on-line in real time in workshop settings and are of particular value in cross-boundary investigations where no one may be fully aware of all the relevant actors, perspectives and resources which may be relevant to the study. 

 

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-RT121: The Potential of Human Security Approaches for Peaceful Development: The Devil is in the Details?
Session Chair: Tamara A. Kool, UNU-MERIT/MGSoG, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Zina Nimeh, UNU-MERIT/MGSoG, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Des Gasper, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Netherlands, The

25 years ago, Mahbub ul Haq captured world attention for the concept of human security in the UNDP’S 1994 Human Development Report. Through a human security lens, the interlinkages between various threats that contribute to increased vulnerability, poverty and conflict in society can be further explored. A human security approach enables also the uncovering of shared values that underlie any peaceful society. Yet, from a practitioner’s perspective, challenges remain in integrating a full human security lens into policy. Bringing together various actors, this roundtable will explore the potential and challenges of a human security perspective towards development grounded in peace and social justice.

Confirmed speakers:

Oscar Gomez -  Assistant Professor at the College of Asia Pacific Studies, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University. His main interest is in global governance and human security practice, with special emphasis on humanitarian crises. He was a Research Fellow at JICA Research Institute for five years and, before that, a JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow at the Graduate School of Global Studies, Doshisha University. He co-wrote background papers for the UNDP’s Human Development Reports of 2014, 2016 and 2020. Recent publications include co-edited volumes on the humanitarian–development nexus (2018, Routledge) and human

security norms in East Asia (2019, Palgrave).

 

Shyamika Jayasundara-Smits - Assistant professor in Conflict and Peace Studies at The International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam , The Netherlands. Her research interests are in the intersections of violent conflicts and Development and on the topics under the broader themes of state building, post-war transitions, security sector reform and EU security and defence policy.

 

Rana Jawad - Associate Professor in Social Policy at the University of Bath and is founder/convener of the MENA social policy network (www.menasp.com), a knowledge sharing and capacity building platform.  Her Particular interests include: political and institutional analysis of social policy systems in MENA; social expenditure and coverage of welfare benefits; social care, social assistance and social insurance; civil society and religious social welfare; inequality; poverty.

 

Jonathan Rudy - peace educator focusing on peacebuilding, conflict transformation, nonviolence, inter-faith dialogue and human security. He has 35 years' experience in 35 countries in Africa and Asia. See www.PeaceBuildingGlobal.com for more information.

 

Lucy Nusseibeh - founder and Chairperson of Middle East Nonviolence and Democracy (MEND) in East Jerusalem, pioneering promotion of awareness about the power of nonviolence. She was head of the Institute of Modern Media at Al-Quds University, has taught at Bir Zeit University, and was a Senior Research Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. She presented on TEDx on nonviolence. She co-edited “Une Philosophie à l'Épreuve de Paix” (Mimesis 2016). Her recent publications include a chapter on "The Power of Media in Peacebuilding" ("Pathways to Peace", MIT 2014) and "Statelessness and Insecurity in the Occupied Palestinian Territory" (GPPAC 2014). She is a gender focal point, member of the Global Strategy Group and Chair of the Improving Practice Working Group at GPPAC., as well as the Chair of the Board of Directors of Nonviolent Peaceforce International (Geneva).

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-RT202: Is There a Moral Imperative for Development Researchers to Act as Advocates?
Session Chair: Adinda Ceelen, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Prof. Arjun Singh Bedi, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

Our understanding of international development is rapidly changing. We are dealing with multiple systemic crises such as climate change, the COVID-19 pandemic and growing inequality. Meanwhile the decolonization debate and shifting communication landscapes present fundamental challenges to the role of researchers and how they communicate knowledge.

This event will zoom in on the topic of development research and communication within the context of transformation processes and change. It will dive into the topic of scholar-activism and impact-oriented research. Our multi-stakeholder panelists will share key insights from different stakeholder and disciplinary perspectives on the topic of research communication and knowledge exchange, before we dive into a group discussion on practical challenges, good practices and lessons learned.

The session will be chaired by Prof. Arjun Bedi (Deputy Rector Research Affairs, ISS).

This roundtable is convened by Adinda Ceelen (Knowledge Broker & Research Communications Advisor, ISS) and Chris Jordan (Communications and Impact Manager, Global Development Institute-UMAN) who co-convene the EADI Working Group on Research Communication.

 

Confirmed speakers:

Prof. Dirk-Jan Koch - Chief Science Officer at the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Speaking on the policy-academia nexus within which development researchers sometimes find themselves in the role of advocates. He will also touch upon existing feedback loops between research and policy-making and ways forward.

Prof. Adriano Nuvunga - Executive Director of the Center for Democracy and Development, Mozambique

Speaking on the practitioner-academia nexus to discuss how researchers can contribute to the work of NGOs and vice versa. Drawing on lessons from the practitioner arena to learn how NGOs communicate and advocate their work.

Dr. Kristen Cheney - Associate Professor in Children and Youth Studies at the ISS

Engaging in research for advocacy and change such that research can be designed and shared to bring about changes in policy and practice. She will also address some of the key skills, methods and approaches that are needed.

Dr. Lata Narayanaswamy - Associate Professor in the Politics of Global Development, University of Leeds

Sharing lessons for development research communication from the decolonization debate and how to be mindful when speaking about “knowledge transfer” within this context.

Dr. Tobias Denskus - Associate Professor in Development Studies at Malmo University

Sharing expert insights and perspectives on digital communication and how to use Twitter in the policy arena.

 

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-SP058 - 1/2: Challenging and Challenges of Development, Solidarity and Social Justice - 1/2
Session Chair: June Fylkesnes, University of Agder, Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Hege Bergljot Wallevik, University of Agder, Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Hanne Haaland, University of Agder, Norway

The dynamics of international development have been and are marked by various actors fighting to control and define “development” and dominate strategic thinking and financial flows. Yet, international development practices are heterogenous with a diversity of actors presenting “alternatives” and resistances to mainstream discourses. Do alternative development actors challenge discourses and practices of solidarity and social justice? Citizen initiatives within humanitarian aid and development are challenging established NGO systems, and religious actors are being recognised as important development partners. The panel will provide a space for discussions about challenging and challenges of development, solidarity and social justice.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-SP106 - 1/2: Rethinking Inequalities in the Era of Growth Limits and Social Injustice - 1/2
Session Chair: Dr. Rogelio Madrueño, University of Göttingen, Germany
Session Chair: José María Larrú, Universidad San Pablo-CEU, CEU Universities, Spain
Session Chair: Dr. David Castells-Quintana, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Inequality is above all a multidimensional problem. It is by no means a complex issue that requires global solutions in accordance with the challenge imposed by the new international environment. More importantly, the emergence of new global challenges questions the possibility of achieving a proper balance between growth, social justice and climate change, which involves an obstacle for the promotion of social development, solidarity and the reduction of inequality. This panel aims to find new understandings to the notion of inequalities (opportunity, income, wealth, gender, etc.) in order to enrich both contemporary development discourse and global cooperative solutions.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-SP114: Blue Economy: Just Transitions and Sustainability Incorporated?
Session Chair: Johan Spamer, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Renata Cavalcanti Muniz, ISS-Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands, The

Since 2012, Blue Economy is portrayed as an inclusive ocean based sustainable development model. Without a common definition and practice, the concept is being interpreted by various actors according to their often-competing agendas and objectives. New notions, such as ‘blue justice’ and ‘blue diplomacy’ are coined as vessels to address inequality, poverty and political marginalization. Based on these ideas, this panel opens the discussion on whether this new framing of development comes as a contribution to the solidarity and social justice agenda or is just another empty categorization. This panel invites draft papers about Blue Economy discourses and practices.

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-WS093: Social Justice in Practices of Research Collaboration: Lessons Learned in DEVELOP Research Programme
Session Chair: Dr. Mikko Tapani Ylikangas, Academy of Finland, Finland

Striving for social justice is central in South-North collaboration in development research. On one hand, development research seeks to contribute to social justice in our global world. On the other hand, the research collaboration in the field itself constantly seeks for more just practices and epistemological standpoints. The panel discusses different angles on social justice in development practice based on the experiences of researchers in the Academy Programme in Development Research (DEVELOP). DEVELOP is jointly funded by the Academy of Finland and the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland for 2018–2022 (9M€). Focusing on three main research themes, DEVELOP supports multidisciplinary, phenomenon-driven and problem-based research in the spirt of Agenda 2030. DEVELOP supports long-term cooperation and promotes equal participation by researchers and research institutes from global South.  The results should first and foremost meet the information needs of partners in developing countries. Against this backdrop, both Northern and Southern representatives of three different projects funded by DEVELOP will reflect the practical ways in which their projects seek to promote social justice, equality and solidarity, and engage with Southern epistemologies in their research collaboration and thus promote social change in i.a. Tanzania, Uganda and Ecuador. They will present their experiences and challenges, not least related to the academic structures that easily enhance inequalities. Moreover, in the final discussion, the panel seeks to identify ways forward and lessons learned for both researchers and the funding agencies. 

Session outline

The workshop will composed of 3 papers from DEVELOP projects in which the researchers will handle the above-mentioned issues.

After the presentations an invited discussant will give comments to each presentation. After that the presenters, discussant and other participants of the workshop will engage in open discussion and exchange of experiences, ideas and good practises. The discussion and outcomes will be transcribed and discussed later in the annual seminar of the DEVELOP programme so that the whole programme will benefit of the fruits of the Hague workshop. Our Hague workshop will be interactive with enough time for interaction with the audience. There will be space for mutual learning and for individual feedback for each presenter through a discussant. Our workshop will certainly be diverse and gender-balanced and the presenters and discussants will be mostly from the Global South (i.a. Tanzania, Uganda, Ecuador.

The three research projects that will open the workshop with presentations are:

  • Theory and practice of learning to be a citizen: Experiences from Tanzania and Uganda, (Lecturer Alice Nankya Ndidde)
  • Goal 4+: Including Eco-Cultural Pluralism in Quality Education in Ecuadorian Amazonia, (Professor Ruth Arias)
  • Environmental sensing of ecosystem services for developing climate-smart landscape framework to improve food security in East Africa, (Doctoral student Antti Autio)

Confirmed speakers

Antti Autio - University of Helsinki

Alice Nankya Ndidde - Department of Adult and Community Education, School of Distance and Lifelong Learning in the College of Education and External Studies, Makerere University, Uganda

Ruth Arias - Prof. Rector of the Universidad Estatal Amazonica, Ecuador

Dr. Andrea Butcher (discussant) - University of Helsinki

 
11:00am - 12:15pm7-WS094: Resource Grabbing: Impacts and Responses in an Era of Climate Change
Session Chair: Dr. Adwoa Yeboah Gyapong, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Amod Shah, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Corinne Lamain, International Institute of Social Studies, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Elyse Mills, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Sergio Coronado, ISS, Germany
Session Chair: Yukari Sekine, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

How do local people resist resource grabs, in organized forms or through everyday, less-visible actions? How does climate change mitigation intensify conflict? This workshop explores these questions, among others, through a participatory discussion on the impacts of and responses to resource grabbing (land, water, fisheries, minerals) and green grabbing (climate change mitigation and adaptation). The workshop will present short reflections from researchers and activists about how agricultural, fisheries and climate change mitigation policies and regulations contribute to resource and green grabbing, their impacts on the ground, and the responses from local people, as well as the broader implications for solidarity-building between affected groups and contemporary struggles for social and environmental justice. This will be followed by an open discussion with all workshop participants on common themes that emerge from these reflections.

Read more about the themes discussed in the workshop here.

Pre-registration is not required for this workshop. However, we encourage participants to inform us of their intention to join by emailing shah@iss.nl and mills@iss.nl so that we can circulate some preparatory information.

 
12:15pm - 12:30pmBreak
 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-HP020: Climate Change Mitigation Measures, Social Justice & Peace. Is It Possible to Move from Hindering to Helping?
Session Chair: Prof. Dirk-Jan Koch, Radboud University, Netherlands, The

The amount of funding available for climate change mitigation measures available in the Global South is rising fast. However, it is much less clear what the effects, let alone the unintended effects, of these billions of investments are, especially with respect to social justice and peace. What happens to indigenous people living of forests when the official title owners are compensated for conserving the forests? What happens to latent land conflicts when suddenly lands are valued for conservation? How can we ensure that climate mitigation measures contribute to social justice & peace instead of hindering them?

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-HP118: Gender Movements and Social Justice
Session Chair: Dr. Stacey Scriver, NUI Galway, Ireland
Session Chair: Prof. G. Honor Fagan, Maynooth University, Ireland

While gender justice is a critical component of equitable development, peace and justice it is often overlooked or underplayed within movements focused on social justice in development contexts. In this panel we seek to deepen understanding of the role of gender movements, and gender in movements (including gender solidarity), working towards peaceful, equitable and just communities and societies. We welcome papers that engage with the issues of gender justice and social movements through a variety of perspectives and approaches. Contributions from early career researchers, established academics, and practitioners, including empirically and theoretically-based draft papers, are all welcomed.

EADI Working Group: Gender Justice

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-HP122: Civil Society Initiatives Promoting Solidarity in Constrained Settings
Session Chair: Dr. Tiina Kontinen, University of Jyväskylä, Finland
Session Chair: Dr. Marianne Millstein, Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Kees Biekart, International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Netherlands, The

A vibrant civil society enhances solidarity, social justice, and peace. However, civil society initiatives often encounter severe limitations. Solidarity networks sometimes function in a way that may counter conventional (Western) conceptualizations of civil society. The panel therefore explores how civil society initiatives are locally conceptualized and realized in a variety of authoritarian, conflict-affected and fragile contexts. Through localized and contextualized notions of civil society, the panel seeks to understand the dynamics of civic-driven change in non-democratic settings, realized by formal and established organizations as well as by informal initiatives.

The panel is organized by the EADI Working Group Citizenship and Civil Society in Development. The aim is to publish the papers of this panel, together with papers from the July 2020 webinar, in an edited volume of the EADI Global Development series with Palgrave publishers.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-HP133: Protracted Crisis and the Humanitarian-Development Nexus
Session Chair: Prof. Jörg Faust, DEval, Germany
Session Chair: Prof. Nadia Molenaers, Univeristy of Antwerpn, Belgium

Millions of people are forcibly displaced by armed conflict and human right violations, creating a huge demand for humanitarian aid. Many of those conflicts have turned into protracted crises and resulting migration has affected neighbouring regions, which are themselves confronted with severe developmental challenges. Consequently, humanitarian aid and development aid today are to be organized in a more harmonized and context specific way if they want to promote short-term alleviation from physical threats and more long-term developmental goals such as peace, solidarity and social justice. Therefore, this harvest panel presents and discusses theory-driven empirical evidence from research and evaluation on the humanitarian-development nexus.

EADI Working Group: Development Cooperation Policies and Performance

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-RT084: Fostering Global, Progressive Solidarity Networks
Session Chair: Dr. Marina Apgar, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, UK, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Marjoke Oosterom, Institute of Development Studies, United Kingdom

For those working towards social justice for all, the state of democracy is in crisis. The surge in populism in Europe and post-truthism under Trump, Brexit in the UK, and the Covid-19 pandemic and associated infodemic exposing deep inequalities in rights, are evidence of ongoing trends that are likely to undermine social justice in the short and long term. This roundtable explores how international development studies can shape our understanding of building solidarity networks in the global north. By implication, the roundtable will debate how international development studies can refocus from its historical and ongoing focus in the globally south to work truly globally. Speakers are academics and activists working alongside and as part of solidarity movements in marginal parts of the world, including Europe and the US.

Confirmed speakers:

Prof. Marianne Mackelbergh - Ghent University (Belgium) and Leiden University (Netherlands)

Prof. Maria Kousis - University of Crete (Greece)

Prof. John Gaventa - Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex (United Kingdom)

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-RT096: Globalization, Inequality and Conflict
Session Chair: Prof. S Mansoob Murshed, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

The last four decades have seen both the acceleration of economic globalization along with a worldwide rise in economic inequality. This has produced a backlash. In both the developed and developing world there is a rising tide of identity based populist politics, where often the economic interests of the poorer groups of the population are cast aside in favour of movements and leaders espousing identity based outcomes that are often illiberal and intolerant, as well as serving to further immiserize the already poor. This session explores these dynamics. It will examine trends in the development of inequality in recent years, the patterns of internal conflict and the growth of populism in recent years, as well as a case study of the internationalisation of a humanitarian crisis in Myanmar. The central theme surrounding this roundtable is that our current epoch of economic globalization produces inequality, a variety of internal conflict, the rise of nationalistic populism as well as humanitarian crisis. In addition, these consequences of the governance of globalization have a common thread running through them.

Convened by S Mansoob Murshed, International Institute of Social Studies (Netherlands) and Coventry University (United Kingdom

Confirmed speakers:     

Pedro Goulart - University of Lisbon (Portugal)

Scott Gates - University of Oslo and Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) (Norway)

Manzoor Hasan - BRAC University (Bangladesh)

Muhammad Badiuzzaman - BRAC University (Bangladesh)

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-RT117: Partnership, Participation and Power in Academia
Session Chair: Dr. Shreya Sinha, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Session Chair: Dr. Katarzyna Cieslik, Unviersity fo Cambridge, Department of Geography, United Kingdom

Academic work is necessarily collaborative. However, ‘partnership’ and ‘collaboration’ have gained particular currency in recent years with grants requiring researchers to have collaborators in the global South and to demonstrate ‘social impact’. While such relationships should build intellectual and political solidarities, this may be undermined by the power-laden context within which such projects are set. This roundtable discusses how such collaborations are installed and maintained during and beyond a project’s lifetime. We will explore questions such as: Are the terms of collaboration equitable? What are its power dynamics? How can academic solidarities be built and maintained through these collaborations?

Confirmed speakers:

Dr Nivedita Narain has over three decades of experience in the development sector while working with PRADAN, an India-based NGO that works at grassroots level to remove mass poverty and challenge inequalities. She is also an active researcher and has been part of several national and international collaborative projects in the fields of rural development and organisational behaviour. 

Dr Tania Martinez is a scholar and practitioner specializing in water management, agriculture and livelihoods, currently affiliated with the Natural Resource Institute, University of Greenwich. Throughout her career she has been involved in numerous international multistakeholder research projects, ranging from sustainable modernization to gender studies.  

Professor Cees Leeuwis is an international scholar currently affiliated with the University of Wageningen. His work focusses on the processes of socio-technical innovation and transformation in network. He has been involved in numerous international research projects, ranging from sustainable agriculture and natural resources management to inclusive value chains.  

Professor Bhaskar Vira is a Head of Geography Department at the University of Cambridge whose research focuses on the political economy of environment and development. He has led numerous large scale intellectual and policy-oriented projects that involve interdisciplinary conversations across the natural and social sciences. 

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-RT127: New Digital Technologies and Sustainable Rural Development
Session Chair: Dr. Oane Visser, ISS, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Karin Astrid Siegmann, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), Netherlands, The

Digitalization increasingly affects sustainable global development. Farming apps, GPS-controlled fishing, and forest-monitoring drones are examples of how the ‘digital’ extends into the realm of natural resources. Governments and development actors have embraced these technologies as solutions to global resource scarcity and environmental problems. Yet, digitalization is likely to fundamentally re-shape labour and property related to natural resources, raising concerns about social justice. This panel investigates the implications for those depending on natural resources for their livelihoods (e.g. farmers, fishermen). It aims to provide an interesting (non-urban) angle to debates on automation, algorithmic governance, labour and commodification of data and nature.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-RT139: Sharing Experiences Among Development Studies Masters Accredited by the EADI International Accreditation Council
Session Chair: Prof. Laura Camfield, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

Since 2011 EADI’s International Accreditation Council (IAC) has accredited and reaccredited a number of MA programmes in Development Studies, notably in China, Colombia, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Samoa and the United Kingdom. The roundtable, featuring programme leaders and student delegates of the accredited programmes in question will highlight post-accreditation experiences on the 3 key areas of IAC’s accreditation, i.e. inter/multidisciplinarity, context-sensitivity and policy relevance paying particular attention to issues of solidarity, peace and social justice. The main entry points for debate are:

  • How they work on inter/multidisciplinarity on these issues
  • How they build in context-sensitivity
  • How they engage with the development process and find the balance between conceptual analysis and influencing policy processes and practice,
  • How they enhance critical thinking around student research, research methods in particular.
  • What are the possible areas of cooperation amongst accredited programmes.

Confirmed speakers:

Lenka Dušková -  Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic

Meera Tiwari - University of East London, UK

Edith Phaswana - South African Development Studies Association, South Africa

Tolulope O Adeyemo - University of East London Alumni, UK

Tamana Safi - University of East London Alumni, UK

Wil Hout - International Institute of Social Studies, The Netherlands

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-RT141: Covid-19 Vaccination in Low Income Countries
Session Chair: Dr. Zemzem Shigute, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The
Session Chair: Dr. Christoph Strupat, German Developmdent Institute, Germany, Germany
Session Chair: Dr. Matthias Rieger, International Institute of Social Studies, the Netherlands, Netherlands, The

In a bid to overcome the Covid-19 pandemic, various countries in the world have started to roll-out different types of Covid-19 vaccines to their respective populations. In several high income-countries, vaccines are rolled-out free of charge. However, in the case of low-income countries, economic limitations and weak health systems do not permit full scale free vaccination. This brings forward the inevitable option of out-of-pocket payment for vaccine by part, if not all, of the population. Moreover, low-income countries are lagging behind in their vaccination campaigns, and evidence on vaccine acceptance and willingness to pay, crucial public health planning inputs, remains scant. The participants of the roundtable will present evidence on potential determinants of willingness to take and pay for Covid-19 vaccine in some low-income countries and discuss potential implications for policy makers.

Confirmed Speakers:

Emmanuel Rukondo - University Bonn

Britta Augsburg - Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

Christoph Strupat - German Development Instiute (DIE)

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-SP058 - 2/2: Challenging and Challenges of Development, Solidarity and Social Justice - 2/2
Session Chair: June Fylkesnes, University of Agder, Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Hege Bergljot Wallevik, University of Agder, Norway
Session Chair: Dr. Hanne Haaland, University of Agder, Norway

The dynamics of international development have been and are marked by various actors fighting to control and define “development” and dominate strategic thinking and financial flows. Yet, international development practices are heterogenous with a diversity of actors presenting “alternatives” and resistances to mainstream discourses. Do alternative development actors challenge discourses and practices of solidarity and social justice? Citizen initiatives within humanitarian aid and development are challenging established NGO systems, and religious actors are being recognised as important development partners. The panel will provide a space for discussions about challenging and challenges of development, solidarity and social justice.

 
12:30pm - 1:45pm8-SP106 - 2/2: Rethinking Inequalities in the Era of Growth Limits and Social Injustice - 2/2
Session Chair: Dr. Rogelio Madrueño, University of Göttingen, Germany
Session Chair: José María Larrú, Universidad San Pablo-CEU, CEU Universities, Spain
Session Chair: Dr. David Castells-Quintana, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain

Inequality is above all a multidimensional problem. It is by no means a complex issue that requires global solutions in accordance with the challenge imposed by the new international environment. More importantly, the emergence of new global challenges questions the possibility of achieving a proper balance between growth, social justice and climate change, which involves an obstacle for the promotion of social development, solidarity and the reduction of inequality. This panel aims to find new understandings to the notion of inequalities (opportunity, income, wealth, gender, etc.) in order to enrich both contemporary development discourse and global cooperative solutions.

 
1:45pm - 2:00pmBreak
 
2:00pm - 3:30pmClosing Plenary Session: How Has the Pandemic Changed our Research Practice?

The closing panel of the conference will discuss what has changed in our research practice as a result of Covid. This could refer to the types of data collection methods, but also by doing online research or by reducing international air travel. What have we lost, what have we gained during the pandemic?

This collective discussion will use an experimental online format: a virtual fish bowl. This means that a person can only speak for a maximum of 3 minutes, building on points raised by a previous speaker. Due to the swift rotation of speakers, many voices can be heard by raising virtual hands, or by contributing to the chat.

Final words by Henning Melber (President of EADI); announcement of the next Conference venue in 2023.

 
3:30pm - 5:00pmButterfly Bar 4

If you prefer to have a bilateral meeting with another conference participant, or a small group, you can meet up in the Butterfly Bar over a drink. Just go to the Bar, where ISS students will receive you in a pleasant setting. You can also come randomly and see who is around. Oh, and please don’t forget to bring your own drink!

 
3:30pm - 5:00pmCoffee Corner Session 4

After the panel sessions you may want to continue talking informally with your colleagues about the panels in your stream that have just ended. For that purpose the Coffee Corner sessions are created. Go to the Coffee corner, and choose your favourite stream from one of the break-out group topics. Of course, you can join any stream of your liking: on a panel you missed, or just to hear which questions were raised in another stream. The streams can be found in the confernece manual here

 
3:30pm - 5:00pmMeet and Greet - ISS Alumni (2/2)

ISS has an extensive alumni network of over 13,000 former students in more than 150 countries. A strong global network of development professionals. By engaging closely with alumni, ISS strengthens its position within the global society, facilitates contact opportunities between students, staff, and alumni, and receives support and input from active alumni, whether regarding advice, research cooperation, capacity development or promoting the ISS brand. Moreover, ISS provides post-graduation services such as refresher courses. The ISS PhD Alumni Association (IPAA) builds its community through discussion platforms, conferences, news sharing, blogs, newsletters and on/-offline events to connect, exchange and collaborate, and to revive memories and relationships with each other, supervisors, etc. The group of over 220 PhD alumni stands out as these alumni have often engaged for longer periods with the institute. As such they have a strong link with the ISS and its research.

 

 
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